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  • Centers for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine

  • Physical Activity Promotion

  • Yoga for Women Attempting Smoking Cessationn

    This study examines the feasibility and initial efficacy of yoga as an adjunct for smoking cessation treatment for women. Women smokers (n=60) will participate in a group-based CBT smoking cessation program and will be randomly assigned to either (1) a twice-weekly yoga program or (2) a wellness (contact control) program.

    Principal Investigator:Beth Bock, PhD

    Co-Investigators: Bess Marcus, PhD; David Williams, PhD; Bruce Becker, MD, MPH; Geoffrey Tremont, PhD; Kathleen Morrow, PhD; and Joseph Fava, PhD

    Funding Agency: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    Dates: 2007 - 2009


    Wii ♥ Fitness: Study One

    The primary goal of this pilot study is to examine the feasibility, acceptability and preliminary efficacy of a supervised program of exergames on markers of physical fitness and cardiovascular disease risk. Sedentary, prehypertensive adults will participate in a 12-week exergame program using Nintendo's Wii gaming platform. A trained research assistant will supervise all exercise sessions in which heart rate will be monitored throughout each session. Assessments will include measures of feasibility (e.g., attendance, study completion), acceptability (e.g., enjoyment, satisfaction), physical fitness, and cardiovascular disease risk (blood pressure, resting heart rate). Our primary outcomes are the feasibility and acceptability of using the Wii to meet the national recommendations for physical activity. Secondary outcomes include changes in fitness and cardiovascular risk indices. We will use descriptive techniques and repeated measures analyses to examine the within-group changes from pre- to post-intervention. If study hypotheses are supported, additional funding will be sought to rigorously test whether exergames are a viable physical activity program that provides enjoyment and variety to individuals at risk for hypertension and/or CVD.

    Principal Investigators:Beth Bock, PhD and Eva Serber, PhD

    Co-Investigators: Joe Ciccolo, PhD and Peter Tilkemeier, MD

    Funding Agency: The Rhode Island Foundation and the Centers for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine

    Dates: 2009-2011

     


    Increasing Physical Activity among Inactive Bariatric Surgery Patients

    This goal of this project is to increase physical activity and improve bariatric surgery outcomes in patients with low physical activity, through targeting both physical activity and sedentary behaviors (K01 DK083438-01).

    Principal Investigator:Dale S. Bond, PhD

    Primary Mentor: Rena Wing, PhD

    Co- Mentors/Investigators: John Jakicic, PhD; Sivamainthan Vithiananthan, MD; Joseph Fava, PhD

    Funding Agency: The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

    Dates: 2009 - 2014

     


    Resistance Training as an Aid to Standard Smoking Cessation

    Cigarette smoking continues to be the leading, preventable cause of death among American adults; however, approximately 20.9 percent of US adults continue to smoke. Concerns about weight gain and mood-related withdrawal symptoms following smoking cessation are known predictors of relapse. Previous large-scale intervention trials indicate that exercise is a beneficial adjunct treatment for smoking cessation, as it positively impacts both weight concerns and negative mood states. The majority of these trials, however, have focused only on women, and only on aerobic exercise. Resistance training (i.e. weight lifting), may also offer smokers a beneficial adjunctive strategy to quit smoking, as it too can both improve mood and manage body weight. As such, the proposed pilot study will test the efficacy of a resistance training program as an aid to standard smoking cessation treatment on cessation among healthy adult male and female smokers. Specifically, we plan to compare the effects of a standard smoking cessation treatment, plus a 12-week resistance training program to the same standard smoking cessation treatment plus equivalent contact control among 60 healthy men and women. Smoking cessation outcomes (prolonged abstinence and point prevalence abstinence) will be verified by carbon monoxide and self-report.  Differences in 12-week and 3-month cessation rates between conditions will provide data for power estimates for an adequately powered clinical trial.

    Principal Investigator:Joseph T. Ciccolo, PhD

    Co-Investigators: Bess Marcus, PhD; David Williams, PhD

    Funding Agency: National Cancer Institute

    Dates: 2008 - 2010


    Adherence to Self-paced vs. Prescribed Intensity Physical Activity: Exploring Mechanisms via Ecological Momentary Assessment

    This study compares adherence to self-paced intensity and prescribed moderate intensity walking programs, and explores acute affective response to exercise as a predictor of treatment outcomes through use of ecological momentary assessment.

    Principal Investigators:Joseph Fava, PhD (Subcontract) and David Williams, PhD (Project PI)

    Funding Agency: National Cancer Institute

    Dates: 2009 - 2011


    Achieving Physical Activity Guidelines through an Enhanced Print Intervention

    This study will determine the differential effect of the print-based individually-tailored intervention used in our parent trial (tailored print) vs. an enhanced print-based individually-tailored intervention (enhanced tailored print) on physical activity adoption and short-term maintenance in previously sedentary apparently healthy adults.

    Principal Investigator:Bess Marcus, PhD

    Co-Investigators: Beth Bock, PhD; Melissa Napolitano, PhD; George Papandonatos, PhD; Alfred Parisi, MD; David Williams, PhD; Anna Albrecht, RN, MS; Jessica Whiteley, PhD; Thomas Lasater, PhD

    Funding Agency:National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

    Dates: 2006 - 2011


    A Lifestyle Intervention to Prevent Recurrent Gestational Diabetes Mellitus
    This study will test the ability of an exercise intervention to prevent recurrent gestational diabetes mellitus. This intervention can readily be translated into clinical practice in underserved and minority populations.

    Principal Investigators:Bess Marcus, PhD (Subcontract) and Lisa Chasan-Taber, ScD(Project PI)

    Co-Investigator: Charles Neighbors, PhD

    Funding Agency: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
    Dates: 2007 - 2011


    Using a YMCA Exercise Program to Enhance Nicotine Dependence Treatment for Women

    This is a Stage III study to test our Commit to Quit (CTQ) smoking cessation program in the community setting of the greater Providence YMCAs. This trial compares cognitive-behavioral smoking cessation treatment plus a program of regular exercise to cognitive-behavioral smoking cessation treatment plus contact control.

    Principal Investigator:Bess Marcus, PhD

    Co-Investigators: Jessica Whiteley, PhD; David Williams, PhD; Beth Bock, PhD; Joe Ciccolo, PhD; Ernestine Jennings, PhD; Alfred Parisi, MD; Anna Albrecht, RN,MS; Joseph Hogan, ScD

    Funding Agency: National Institute on Drug Abuse

    Dates: 2006 - 2011


    Culturally and Linguistically Adapted Physical Activity Intervention for Latinas

    The purpose of the study is to promote physical activity among this at-risk population using a high-reach, low-cost strategy, which has great potential for adoption on a larger scale and thus high potential for reducing existing health disparities in the U.S.

    Principal Investigator:Bess Marcus, PhD

    Funding Agency: National Institute of Nursing Research

    Dates: 2009 - 2013


    Maintaining Exercise after Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Maintaining exercise participation among patients who have completed cardiac rehabilitation is integral to secondary prevention of coronary events and cardiac re-hospitalization. To promote exercise maintenance after completion of a 12 week Phase II rehabilitation program, we propose to offer a theoretically-based intervention that we have used successfully to promote exercise among older, primary-care patients. This program (maintenance counseling) includes brief advice from the cardiac rehabilitation case manager at Phase II program discharge followed by telephone-counseling based on the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change and Social Cognitive Theory. Using a randomized controlled design, 180 patients will be assigned to maintenance counseling or brief advice plus contact control. Outcome assessments will include an exercise tolerance test (baseline/post-rehabilitation and 6 months), self-reported exercise participation, motivational readiness for exercise, and objective activity monitoring at baseline, 6 and 12 months. These data will help to identify whether telephone-based exercise counseling is an effective strategy for sustaining regular exercise and fitness among cardiac rehabilitation patients, thereby contributing to secondary prevention of coronary heart disease.

    Principal Investigator:Bernardine Pinto, PhD

    Co-Investigators: Michael Goldstein, MD; George Papandonatos, PhD; Bess Marcus, PhD; John Todaro, PhD; Peter Tilkemeier, MD

    Funding Agency: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

    Dates: 2004 - 2010


    Promoting Physical Activity after Colorectal Cancer

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the U.S. and, if detected early, has a favorable prognosis. Colorectal cancer survivors face many physical and psychosocial sequelae including second cancers, adverse effects on major organs, cognitive, and sexual function, problems in work and social roles, and reduced quality of life. This study focuses on enhancing recovery by offering a home-based physical activity program to patients who have completed treatment for colorectal cancer. This study will test the efficacy of the physical activity intervention using a randomized controlled design among 134 patients who have completed treatment for colorectal cancer in the past 2 years. Outcomes will include physical activity behavior, fitness, vigor, fatigue, physical functioning, and body esteem among participants at baseline, 3(posttreatment),6 and 12 months. We will also track intervention costs and conduct exploratory analyses of moderators and mediators of change to help guide the future development of physical activity interventions to enhance recovery from colorectal cancer.

    Principal Investigator:Bernardine Pinto, PhD

    Co-Investigators: Michael Goldstein, MD; George Papandonatos, PhD; Bess Marcus, PhD; Charles Neighbors, PhD; William Sikov, MD

    Funding Agency: National Cancer Institute

    Dates: 2004 - 2010


    Community Volunteers Promoting Physical Activity among Cancer Survivors

    To determine the effects of Reach to Recovery (RTR) volunteers at American Cancer Society (ACS) offices providing brief physical activity (PA) counseling via telephone(RTR Plus) over 12 weeks to 120 women who contact collaborating ACS offices (3 offices) for RTR services.

    Principal Investigator:Bernardine Pinto, PhD

    Co-Investigators: Michael Goldstein, MD; George Papandonatos, PhD, Kevin Stein, PhD; Susan Richter; Debborah Smith, MBA

    Funding Agency: National Cancer Institute

    Dates: 2009 - 2012

     


    Web Based Physical Activity Intervention for Young Adult Cancer Survivors

    Those diagnosed with cancer between the ages of 18 and 39 face a number of increased risks including an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, second cancers, and emotional distress. Despite their increased risks, very little research has targeted young adult cancer survivors and there is evidence that they have many unmet psychosocial and behavioral health needs. The goal of this study is to address some of these unmet needs by developing and pilot testing a physical activity intervention for young adult cancer survivors. The intervention is based on a previously developed, theoretically-grounded, tailored Internet intervention for sedentary adults. Two key enhancements have been added to the intervention website in order to target young adult cancer survivors: 1) information pertinent to cancer survivors initiating an exercise program and 2) a peer-to-peer support component. Ten young adult cancer survivors evaluated the targeted intervention website and provided qualitative feedback. Their feedback was used to make additional revisions and the revised intervention is now being pilot tested. Participants recruited for the pilot test are randomly assigned to an intervention group (receiving 12 weeks of access to the intervention website) or a comparison group (receiving information on other cancer-specific Internet sites). Data on intervention feasibility and acceptability is being collected along with preliminary data on intervention effects (i.e., on physical activity level, mood, and fatigue).

    Principal Investigator:Carolyn Rabin, PhD

    Co-Investigators: Bess Marcus, PhD, Fred Schiffman, MD

    Funding Agency: National Cancer Institute

    Dates: 2008 - 2010


    Exercise and Relaxation Intervention for Young Adult Cancer Survivors

    There is evidence that cancer diagnosis and treatment during young adulthood puts survivors at risk for a number of medical and psychosocial difficulties including cardiovascular disease, second cancers and psychological distress. This study is aimed at developing a physical activity and relaxation intervention for young adult cancer survivors in order to address some of these risks. The objective of the study is to pilot test a 12-week theoretically grounded physical activity and relaxation intervention for young adult cancer survivors. Sixty participants will be recruited for the study and randomly assigned to receive a 12-week physical activity and relaxation intervention or to a wait list control group. The intervention is designed to help young adult cancer survivors begin a program of moderate-intensity activity and learn mindfulness meditation. We hypothesize that the intervention will be feasible for and acceptable to young adult cancer survivors. We also hypothesize that the intervention group will demonstrate increased levels of physical activity, improved mood and reduced fatigue relative to the wait list control group at a follow-up assessment. In addition, we will conduct exploratory tests of intervention effects on fitness, flexibility, body mass and waist circumference.

    Principal Investigator:Carolyn Rabin, PhD

    Co-Investigators: Bernardine Pinto, PhD; Fred Schiffman, MD; Don Dizon, MD; Joseph Fava, PhD

    Funding Agency: American Cancer Society

    Dates: 2009 - 2013


    Cardiac Autonomic Regulation Enhancement through Exercise CARE-E) Trial

    This project examines the feasibility, acceptability, and short-term efficacy of a randomized clinical trial examining a 3-month supervised exercise intervention compared to a heart healthy education intervention, designed specifically for patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) with the primary aim of estimating an effect size for change in  parasympathetic activity. Other aims of this study are examining: (1) intervention effects on the frequencies of arrhythmias and ICD therapies, and (2) parasympathetic function in relation to changes in exercise tolerance. The study will also examine changes in psychological well-being and quality of life from pre- to post- intervention (3-months), and short-term follow-up (6-months).

    Principal Investigator:Eva R. Serber, PhD

    Co-Investigators: Alfred Buxton, MD; Bess Marcus, PhD; Ray Niaura, PhD; Peter Tilkemeier, MD; John Todaro, PhD

    Funding Agency: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

    Dates: 2008 - 2011

     


    Lifestyle Intervention to Treat Erectile Dysfunction (LITE)

    The purpose of this planning grant is to plan a randomized clinical trial to test the efficacy of lifestyle intervention (weight loss and increased activity) in obese men with erectile dysfunction.

    Principal Investigator:Rena R. Wing, PhD

    Co-Investigator: Dale Bond, PhD

    Funding Agency: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

    Dates: 2009 - 2011


    The Look AHEAD Continuation: Action for Health in Diabetes

    Look AHEAD is a randomized clinical trial examining the long-term health effects of an intensive weight loss intervention in approximately 5,145 overweight volunteers with type 2 diabetes. Participants are randomized to an intensive lifestyle intervention designed to achieve and maintain weight loss by decreased caloric intake and increased physical activity, or to a control program of diabetes support and education. The primary outcome of Look AHEAD is the aggregate occurrence of severe cardiovascular events (fatal and non-fatal Ml and stroke and cardiovascular deaths) over a planned follow-up of 11.5 years. The continuation of this project allows for completion of follow up outcome assessments and the continued administration of the lifestyle intervention. These procedures will enable us to analyze the effects of the intervention on serious cardiovascular- related factors and complications, and cost-effectiveness of the intervention. (5U01DK056992-11)

    Principal Investigator:Rena R. Wing, PhD

    Co-Investigators: Vincent Pera, MD; Jeanne McCaffery, PhD

    Funding Agency: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and the National Institute of Nursing Research

    Dates: 1999 - 2013


    Increasing Sleep Duration: A Novel Approach to Weight Control

    This project, which establishes the Center for Behavioral Intervention Development (CBID), seeks to translate the basic science on sleep duration into a novel intervention to reduce obesity and obesity-related co- morbidities. The project involves a programmatic series of studies to develop a sleep + weight loss intervention. The target population for these studies will be young adults (age 25 - 45) where the association between sleep duration and obesity appears strongest, who are overweight or obese (BMI 25 - 40), and who currently sleep less than six and a half hours per night. This series of studies will be used to examine the effects of increases in sleep duration alone and in combination with a weight loss program on eating and exercise behaviors (measured objectively), and ultimately on body weight. The effects of increasing sleep duration on physiological, psychological and cognitive changes that may relate to the changes in eating and activity and adherence to weight control recommendations will also be examined. The CBID creates a new interdisciplinary team, including investigators in the areas of behavioral weight control, basic and clinical aspects of sleep, fMRI and neuropsychological assessment of cognitive function, eating and exercise behavior, and physiological changes associated with sleep and weight. (U01 CA150387-01)

    Principal Investigator:Rena Wing, PhD

    Co-Investigators: Dale Bond, PhD, Mary Carskadon, PhD; Robert Considine, PhD; Ron Cohen, PhD; Joseph Fava, PhD; Chantelle Hart, PhD; Jeanne McCaffery, PhD; Richard Millman, MD; George Papandonatos, PhD; Donn Posner, PhD; Hollie Raynor, PhD; Katherine Sharkey, MD; and Larry Sweet, PhD

    Funding Agency: The National Cancer Institute

     

    Dates: 2009 - 2014