Patient & Visitor InformationContact Us
  • Centers for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine

  • Qualitative Health Research Methods

  • Diabetes Care in American Samoa

    As type 2 diabetes prevalence increases in the United States, the burden of diabetes falls more on groups with greater barriers to care, such as language and cultural differences, and lower economic resources. These disparities extend to the US Territory of American Samoa, where the proportion of adults over 18 with diabetes was 19.6 percent in 2002, compared to 6.4 percent of US adults. This project will translate recent advances in diabetes care into clinical practice for the American Samoan community by improving methods of health care delivery and methods of diabetes self management. We will conduct a randomized clinical trial to test the effectiveness of a community health worker and primary-care coordinated intervention to provide outreach, education and support to type 2 diabetes patients and their families. The outcomes at a one-year follow-up will include glycosolated hemoglobin (HbA1c), cardiovascular disease risk factors, diet and exercise behaviors and adherence to diabetes care guidelines.

    Principal Investigators:Judith DePue, EdD (Subcontract) and Stephen McGarvey, PhD (Project PI)

    Co-Investigators: Michael Goldstein, MD and Rochelle Rosen, PhD

    Funding Agency: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

    Dates: 2006 - 2011

     


    Recruiting and Retaining Young Adults in Behavioral Weight Loss Treatment

    The goals of this grant are twofold: 1) to use qualitative methods to conduct formative work aimed at improving recruitment and retention efforts with emerging adults, and 2) to conduct a randomized controlled trial to test the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of three different approaches to longer-term weight control with this age group. (K23 DK083440-01)

    Principal Investigator:Jessica Gokee LaRose, PhD

    Co-Investigators/Mentors: Rena R. Wing, PhD; Elissa Jelalian, PhD; Kathleen Morrow, PhD; Joseph Fava, PhD; Cora E. Lewis, MD

    Funding Agency: The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

    Dates: 2009 - 2014

     


    Linking Biophysical Functions of Microbicides to User Perception and Acceptability

    This is a project funded through the NIH's Microbicide Innovation Program (MIP). The goal of this study is to explore the potential correspondence between specific omnibus measures of microbicide formulation properties and rheology and similarly omnibus scale measures of women's experiences with those formulations. Using qualitative methods, quantitative scale items were generated and are now being evaluated. A link between biophysical properties and user evaluation of vaginal products would allow the co-optimization of drug deployment and product acceptability, ultimately leading to highly effective anti-HIV topical vaginal microbicides.

    Principal Investigator:Kathleen M. Morrow, PhD

    Co-Investigators: David Katz, PhD; Patrick Kiser, PhD; Joseph Fava, PhD; Rochelle Rosen, PhD; Erna (Milu) Kojic, MD; Lori Panther, MD

    Funding Agency: National Institute of Mental Health

    Dates: 2006 - 2011


    Long-acting Acceptable Microbicides: Novel Delivery, Activity and Pharmacodynamics

    This project is funded under NIAID's "Integrated Preclinical/Clinical Program for HIV Topical Microbicides" (U19) mechanism. The overall project aims to develop, evaluate and progress new anti-HIV compounds and novel delivery systems through the microbicide pipeline. Specifically, compounds that inhibit viral entry, attachment, and reverse transcription will be tested and developed in novel forms (i.e., long-acting vaginal gels and intravaginal rings).Project 3 (Morrow, PI) is responsible for developing instruments to measure factors related to product acceptability and use and optimize potential acceptability and use of the products developed in this research.

    Principal Investigator:Kathleen M. Morrow, PhD (PI: Project 3)

    Co-Investigators: Robert Buckheit, PhD (PI: U19, and Core A and C); David Katz, PhD (PI: Project 2); Patrick Kiser, PhD (PI: Project 1); Charlene Dezzutti, PhD (PI: Core D); Todd Parsley, PhD (PI: Core B); Lisa Rohan, PhD (Co-PI: Project 2); Joseph Fava, PhD (Co-I on Project 3); Rochelle Rosen, PhD (Co-I on Project 3)

    Funding Agency: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

    Dates: 2008 - 2013


    Evaluation of the Behavioral Measures of Acceptability of Two Vaginal Gels

    The goal of this study is to evaluate novel vaginal gel formulations and the potential correspondence between formulation properties and rheology and measures of women's experiences with those formulations. A link between biophysical properties and user evaluation of vaginal products would allow the co-optimization of drug deployment and product acceptability, ultimately leading to highly effective anti-HIV topical vaginal microbicides.

    Principal Investigator:Kathleen M. Morrow, PhD

    Co-Investigators: David Katz, PhD; Patrick Kiser, PhD; Joseph L. Fava, PhD; Rochelle Rosen, PhD; Erna (Milu) Kojic, MD; Lori Panther, MD

    Funding Agency: CONRAD

    Dates: 2009 - 2010


    Feasibility and Acceptability of SILCS Diaphragm as a Microbicide Delivery System

    The goal of this study is to examine the potential to use the SILCS diaphragm, developed by PATH (Program for Appropriate Technology in Health), as a vaginal microbicide delivery system. Using MRI imagining and behavioral acceptability measures, the study will explore both the actual deployment of vaginal gel as a function of different application processes using the SILCS, and how that deployment is related to acceptability.

    Principal Investigators:Kathleen M. Morrow, PhD (Subcontract); Patricia Coffey, PhD (Project PI); Kurt Barnhart, MD

    Funding Agency: United States Agency for International Development

    Dates: 2007 - 2010


    Affect Management Intervention for Early Adolescents with Mental Health Problems

    This is an NIMH-funded intervention development grant. The goal of the subcontract for this project is to use qualitative methods to discern appropriate content, language and format for a behavioral intervention targeting sexual risk among early adolescents identified as "at-risk" for mental health concerns.

    Principal Investigators:Kathleen M. Morrow, PhD (Subcontract) and Christopher Houck, PhD (Project PI)

    Funding Agency: National Institute of Mental Health

    Dates: 2007 - 2010