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  • Current Active Grants

  • Maintaining Exercise after Cardiac Rehabilitation

    Maintaining exercise participation among patients who have completed cardiac rehabilitation is integral to secondary prevention of coronary events and cardiac re-hospitalization. To promote exercise maintenance after completion of a 12 week Phase II rehabilitation program, we propose to offer a theoretically-based intervention that we have used successfully to promote exercise among older, primary-care patients. This program (maintenance counseling) includes brief advice from the cardiac rehabilitation case manager at Phase II program discharge followed by telephone-counseling based on the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change and Social Cognitive Theory. Using a randomized controlled design, 180 patients will be assigned to maintenance counseling or brief advice plus contact control. Outcome assessments will include an exercise tolerance test (baseline/post-rehabilitation and 6 months), self-reported exercise participation, motivational readiness for exercise, and objective activity monitoring at baseline, 6 and 12 months. These data will help to identify whether telephone-based exercise counseling is an effective strategy for sustaining regular exercise and fitness among cardiac rehabilitation patients, thereby contributing to secondary prevention of coronary heart disease.

    Principal Investigator: Bernardine Pinto, PhD

    Co-Investigators: Michael Goldstein, MD; George Papandonatos, PhD; Bess Marcus, PhD; John Todaro, PhD; Peter Tilkemeier, MD

    Funding Agency: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

    Dates: 2004 - 2010


    Promoting Physical Activity after Colorectal Cancer

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the U.S. and, if detected early, has a favorable prognosis. Colorectal cancer survivors face many physical and psychosocial sequelae including second cancers, adverse effects on major organs, cognitive, and sexual function, problems in work and social roles, and reduced quality of life. This study focuses on enhancing recovery by offering a home-based physical activity program to patients who have completed treatment for colorectal cancer. This study will test the efficacy of the physical activity intervention using a randomized controlled design among 134 patients who have completed treatment for colorectal cancer in the past 2 years. Outcomes will include physical activity behavior, fitness, vigor, fatigue, physical functioning, and body esteem among participants at baseline, 3(posttreatment),6 and 12 months. We will also track intervention costs and conduct exploratory analyses of moderators and mediators of change to help guide the future development of physical activity interventions to enhance recovery from colorectal cancer.

    Principal Investigator: Bernardine Pinto, PhD

    Co-Investigators: Michael Goldstein, MD; George Papandonatos, PhD; Bess Marcus, PhD; Charles Neighbors, PhD; William Sikov, MD

    Funding Agency: National Cancer Institute

    Dates: 2004 - 2010


    Community Volunteers Promoting Physical Activity Among Cancer Survivors
    To determine the effects of Reach to Recovery (RTR) volunteers at American Cancer Society (ACS) offices providing brief physical activity (PA) counseling via telephone (RTR Plus) over 12 weeks to 120 women who contact collaborating ACS offices (3 offices) for RTR services.

    Principal Investigator: Bernardine Pinto, PhD

    Co-Investigators: Michael Goldstein, MD; George Papandonatos, Ph.D., Kevin Stein, Ph.D., Susan Richter, Debborah Smith, MBA

    Funding Agency: National Cancer Institute

    Dates: 2009 - 2012