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  • Meet the Team

  • Adult Simulation  ·  Pediatric Simulation  ·  Nurse Educators
    Paramedic Educator  ·  Simulation Fellow  ·  Business Manager
    Simulation Specialists  ·  Administrative Support

    Simulation Center Co-Directors

     

    Frank Overly, MD

    Frank Overly, MD, FAAP is co-director of the Medical Simulation Center and director of pediatric simulation. He is an associate professor of emergency medicine and pediatrics at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. He received a bachelor of science in electrical engineering from Bucknell University and received his medical degree from the University of Rochester. He was a pediatric resident at the Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh and completed a fellowship in pediatric emergency medicine at Hasbro Children's Hospital. He is currently an attending physician in the pediatric emergency department at Hasbro Children's Hospital. He has published on a variety of subjects including pediatric simulation, pediatric sedation, asthma and orthopedics. His current research interests include medical education, teamwork training and systems/ process assessment with the use of simulation.


     
    Leo Kobayashi, MD

    Leo Kobayashi, MD, co-director of the Rhode Island Hospital Medical Simulation Center, completed his emergency medicine residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital / Massachusetts General Hospital in 2002 and has acquired significant experience in medical simulation from academic, research and teaching duties at the Rhode Island Hospital Medical Simulation Center. Kobayashi is an associate professor and active educator in the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and its postgraduate training program in emergency medicine. His research focuses on advancing the concepts of portable simulation for acute care systems probing for patient safety, in situ device use-testing and multi-patient simulation for emergency care. Kobayashi is past chair of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) Simulation Interest Group, inaugural panel member of the SAEM Simulation Academy and a reviewer for the Society for Simulation in Healthcare's journal Simulation in Healthcare.

     


     

    Adult Simulation

     

    Gregory Jay, MD

    Gregory Jay, MD, PhD is an associate professor of medicine and engineering at Brown University and a faculty member in the Center for Bioengineering. He is an attending physician in emergency medicine, Associate Chair of Research in the department of emergency medicine at the Warren Alpert Medical School and is co-founder of the Rhode Island Hospital Medical Simulation Center. He has published widely on topics in applied biomedical engineering and was a co-principal investigator of the MedTeams™ Project. He has served on the Patient Safety Task Force for both the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine and the American College of Emergency Physicians. He was formerly a flight surgeon in the Air National Guard, where he both developed and participated in crew resource management and weapons of mass destruction training.


     
    John Foggle John Foggle, MD, MBA is an associate professor of emergency medicine (clinical) at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, with expertise in medical simulation, wilderness medicine, disaster preparedness and international emergency medicine development. Foggle has 24 years experience as a clinician and educator, frequently works and lectures internationally, and is trained and board-certified in both emergency medicine and internal medicine. His medical simulation teaching focuses on teamwork, communication, procedural skills and trauma management.

     
     

    Ilse Jenouri, MD is lead instructor for airway management training at the Medical Simulation Center. She received her medical degree at SUNY Health Science Center at Syracuse. She is a clinical assistant professor of emergency medicine at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and an attending emergency physician at The Miriam Hospital.


     
    David Lindquist, MD

    David Lindquist, MD is a lead teamwork training instructor for the Medical Simulation Center. He received a bachelor's degree in neuroscience from Amherst College in 1990, his medical degree from the University of Vermont in 1999, and completed his emergency medicine residency at Rhode Island Hospital in 2003. He is an assistant professor of emergency medicine at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and an attending emergency physician at The Miriam Hospital and Rhode Island Hospital. His areas of interest include teamwork training, patient safety and simulator-based medical education.


     
      Christopher Muratore, ,MD Christopher Muratore, MD is a pediatric surgeon and director of the Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) Program at Rhode Island Hospital and its Hasbro Children's Hospital. He attended medical school at Georgetown University and completed general surgical residency training at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and pediatric surgery residency at Children's Hospital Boston. During general surgery training, he spent an additional year of study at Children's Hospital as the ICU/ECMO fellow, followed by two additional years of training in the pediatric surgical research laboratories investigating the treatment of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Muratore maintains an active interest in the outcomes of patients with CDH, pulmonary hypertension and adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome who require ECMO. ECMO is a form of long-term cardiopulmonary bypass used to treat infants, children and adults with reversible respiratory and/or cardiac failure. ECMO is a high-risk endeavor requiring sophisticated interdisciplinary coordination. Recently, the ECMO program has developed a simulation curriculum to improve interdisciplinary team performance and protect patient outcomes. These novel ECMO simulation scenarios, which complement individual and team ECMO training, combine the current life-like medical simulation models with the ultra-specialized circumstances of extracorporeal life support. This project demonstrates ECMO simulation's potential to improve team performance and patient outcomes.

     
        Catherine Pettit, MD is the AY 2012-2013 medical simulation fellow. She received her medical degree and completed her emergency medicine residency at the University of Maryland. She is currently an active attending physician at Rhode Island and The Miriam hospitals. Her research interests are in prehospital provider simulation and graduate medical learner education.

     
    Ivona Sedive, MD

    Ivona Sediva, MD is a pediatric critical care physician and assistant professor of pediatrics (clinical) at The Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University.

    Sediva earned her medical degree from Second Medical Faculty of Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. She completed her residency in pediatrics at St. Vincent's Medical Center in New York, NY and fellowship in pediatric critical care at Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital in Cleveland, OH. Prior joining Hasbro Children's Hospital she worked for four years at Cooper University Hospital in Camden, NJ.

    Sediva is board certified in general pediatrics and pediatric critical care medicine by the American Board of Pediatrics, and is a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the Society for Simulation in Healthcare. Her interests are in medical simulation, medical education and quality initiatives in pediatrics. She is director of quality for Hasbro Children's Hospital.


     
    Jessica Smith

    Jessica Smith, MD, FACEP is a clinical assistant professor of emergency medicine and the Emergency Medicine Residency Program director at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. She is a graduate of the Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami and completed her residency training in emergency medicine at Boston Medical Center. She is currently an attending physician at Rhode Island and The Miriam hospitals. Her simulation interest focuses on medical student and graduate medical learner education.


     
    Elizabeth Sutton, MD

    Elizabeth Sutton, MD is an assistant professor of emergency medicine at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, where she serves as the emergency medicine director for medical student education. She is a graduate of Georgetown University School of Medicine and completed her residency training in emergency medicine at Baystate Medical Center. She is a member of the Rhode Island Disaster Medical Assistance Team. She has special interests in postgraduate education, disaster medicine and wilderness medicine. She is currently doing research in high-fidelity simulation in medical education, in simulation-based teamwork training and in excellence in women's health education.


     
      Lynn Sweeney, MD Lynn Sweeney, MD is an assistant professor of clinical emergency medicine at the Warren Alpert School of Medicine of Brown University and is an attending physician at both Rhode Island and The Miriam hospitals. She graduated suma cum laude with bachelors of science in her double majors of marketing and print journalism from Syracuse University. After ten years working in sales, she returned to school and earned her medical degree from Brown University. During her residency at Rhode Island Hospital, Sweeney developed a special interest in the way medical staff communicated with their patients. She led a venture called Refining the Patient Experience, a customer service training initiative designed to improve the patient experience in the emergency department. In 2009, she received funding to co-lead Project CLEAR (Communication Leading to Excellence and Ameliorating Risk), a quality improvement program that utilizes simulation-enhanced training to teach both crew resource management and patient service to multidisciplinary medicine teams throughout Lifespan. The program has received both local and national recognition for the novelty of its approach. Fundamentally, health professionals are taught an algorithmic approach for optimizing the patient encounter. Sweeney sees a growing role for simulation as a tool in educating her fellow providers particularly in the topic of effective staff communication to enhance the quality and efficiency of bedside care. On the horizon, she hopes to develop a curriculum aimed at simulation-based training for managers in the art of having courageous conversations that coach team members in a manner that enables each staff member to develop to their full potential as a medical provider.

     
    Robert Tubbs, MD Robert Tubbs, MD

     
    Ronald Van Ness-Otunno, MD Ronald Van Ness-Otunnu, MD, MS is an emergency medicine physician at Sturdy Memorial Hospital in Attleboro, Massachusetts. He received a bachelor’s degree in English and African studies from the University of Connecticut, a master’s degree in physiology from Georgetown University, a medical degree from the University of Vermont and completed his emergency medicine residency at Rhode Island Hospital. His simulation interest is airway skills training.

     
    Kenneth Williams, MD Kenneth Williams, MD graduated from the University of Massachusetts Medical School and completed his residency at the University of Pittsburgh in 1987. His primary interests are EMS and informatics. He has published a variety of articles and textbook chapters and is active in several organizations, serving as president of Rhode Island ACEP, president of the Air Medical Physician Association, physician medical consultant to the Rhode Island Department of Health EMS Division, and RI-I DMAT senior medical officer and USCG liaison. He is principal investigator of the Rhode Island Disaster Initiative, a multi-year EMS disaster care research project.

     

    Pediatric Simulation

     
    Ilise Jenouri, MD

    Linda Brown, MD is a member of the faculty at the Rhode Island Hospital Medical Simulation Center. She received a bachelor of arts degree in biology from Colby College and a medical degree from Pennsylvania State College of Medicine. She completed a pediatric residency at Hasbro Children's Hospital and a fellowship in pediatric emergency medicine at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. During her fellowship, she also received a master of science degree in clinical epidemiology from the University of Pennsylvania. Her current research interests include improving medical education through high-fidelity simulation, and the use of simulation to educate pre-hospital providers and community practitioners.


     
    Linda Duffy

    Susan Duffy, MD is an attending physician in the emergency department at Hasbro Children's Hospital. She received her medical degree from Brown Medical School and completed her pediatric residency at Massachusetts General Hospital. She earned her master's in public health at Columbia University before returning to Providence, where she completed a fellowship in pediatric emergency medicine. She is an associate professor of emergency medicine and pediatrics at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. She is the director of fast track and nurse practitioner programs at Hasbro Children's Hospital. Her fields of interest include medical education, child maltreatment and domestic violence.


     

    Simulation Fellow

     
      Yasser A. Alaska, MD is a medical simulation fellow who received his medical degree from King Saud University, Saudi Arabia. He completed his residency training in King Fahd National Guard Hospital and is double board certified in emergency medicine. He works as an attending in King Khaled University Hospital, Saudi Arabia.

     

    Nurse Educators

     
     Patricia Carreiro

    Patricia Carreiro, RN, BSN is clinical manager of Rhode Island Express Care and LifePACT Critical Care Transport, and co-leader of the pediatric FAST Team. Carreiro received her nursing degree from Northeastern University in Boston and has more than 20 years of experience in pediatric nursing. She is responsible for helping to create ongoing education using simulation for the LifePACT team, and helped to develop and teach the Pediatric Emergency Assessment, Recognition, and Stabilization (PEARS) course using simulation for registered nurses in pediatrics. Correiro has been part of the Medical Simulation Center since 2006 and has helped to teach simulation to residents, attendings and nursing staff. She is also a PALS instructor, and helps to teach these classes in the Medical Simulation Center.  


     
    Charlene Draleau, RN

    Charlene Draleau, MSN, RN, CPEN, CPN is a clinical development specialist in the nursing professional practice and research department at Rhode Island Hospital and Hasbro Children’s Hospital. Draleau maintains adjunct clinical faculty relationships with the local nursing programs facilitating pediatric clinical experiences. Her nursing career has been devoted to the care of the pediatric emergency and trauma patients. She is the facilitator for the pediatric and adult medical-surgical novice nurse programs as well as the pediatric critical care internship, and utilizes simulation to provide a safe place for novice nurses to practice and refine their nursing skills and knowledge to provide safe care for their patients. Draleau is training center faculty for both BLS and Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS).


     
      Jeffrey Devine, RN, NREMT-P is a paramedic and registered nurse with over 17 years of emergency medicine experience. He is currently working as a registered nurse in the emergency department at Rhode Island Hospital. He has performed a variety of roles in the Simulation Center. He helps to run the simulation-enhanced ACLS and Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) programs, has helped develop ECMO simulations, and collaborates on research and course development. He enjoys creating custom simulation tools such as task trainers, special use manikins, and custom moulage using cast silicone, acrylic gel and expired medical supplies.

     
    Helen McGovern, RN Helen McGovern, MSN, RN is a clinical development specialist in the nursing professional practice and research division at Rhode Island Hospital. She is also an associate professor of nursing at the Community College of Rhode Island. Her responsibilities include providing new and experienced RN staff with ongoing educational opportunities utilizing simulation. McGovern’s nursing career has spanned over 33 years and includes 10 years of experience in interventional cardiology. She is a certified instructor for Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), a graduate of the University of Rhode Island in 2000 with a focus in nursing education and a member of Sigma Theta Tau.

     
     Jessica Hay Jessica Hay, MSN, CPNP-AC is a board-certified pediatric nurse practitioner at Bradley Hospital. She graduated with a degree in advertising and marketing from Radford University in 2000 and in 2006 went on to achieve a degree in nursing from the University of Virginia’s Second Degree Nursing Program. Hay worked as a registered nurse in an emergency department, pediatric critical care unit and outpatient surgery center prior to attaining her master’s degree in nursing from the University of Pennsylvania’s Acute/Chronic Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program in 2010. Prior to starting her current position, Hay worked as a volunteer medical provider with Shoulder to Shoulder, a non-profit organization in Intibuca, Honduras. She currently sits on the board of directors for the Brown/Guachi affiliate of Shoulder to Shoulder. In 2013, Hay led an interdisciplinary team to develop a rapid response medical code team, one of only a few in freestanding psychiatric hospitals throughout the country. She continues to have an interest in quality improvement and is currently working on a hospital wide initiative to address pediatric obesity in children with psychiatric illness.

     
      Heidi Paradis, RN, CCRN has been a critical care nurse educator at The Miriam Hospital since 2007 and has worked in acute care nursing since 1985. She has worked in critical care nursing since 1996. Paradis holds a BSN degree from the University of Rhode Island, has completed a course in simulation at Rhode Island College, and has helped develop and provide simulation experiences for nurses at both the Rhode Island Hospital and Rhode Island College simulation centers and at Miriam Hospital. Her interests include critical care, cardiac and teamwork and patient safety education.

     
      Lisa Paolino, RN, BSN

     
      Joan Walsh, RN, CNRN

     

    Paramedic Educator

     
     Nelson Pedro, MD Nelson Pedro, NREMT-P is the operation coordinator of the LifePACT Critical Care Transport Team, a critical care transport service of Rhode Island Hospital and its Hasbro Children's Hospital. Pedro received his paramedic training at Northeastern University followed by his critical care training at University of Baltimore and the Cleveland Clinic. In addition to his leadership duties and transport experience with LifePACT, he also serves as a paramedic/firefighter with the Cranston Fire Department and RI1-DMAT. He brings 21 years of in-hospital and pre-hospital medical experience.

     

    Business Manager

     
      John Callahan is the administrative manger of the Simulation Center. He received a bachelor of science in health services administration from Ithaca College and his master's in management sciences from Lesley University. Callahan has been with Lifespan since 1993. During his tenure, he has served in numerous leadership roles within human resources, shared services, process enhancement, nursing and perioperative services. He has a keen interest in supporting the development and implementation of education interventions that teach clinicians the skills they need to deliver world-class patient care.

     

    Simulation Specialists

     
      Max Dannecker, NREMT-I has been involved with emergency medical services since 2000 and has been a nationally registered EMT since 2008, with experience in 911 and intra-facility transports. He became an EMT-Intermediate in 2010 and has served as a field training officer. He is a merit badge counselor for the Boy Scouts of America and is an eagle scout. His medical background supports the Medical Simulation Center's training operations.

     
    Mark Jones

    Mark Jones is a veteran audiovisual specialist with over twenty years' experience working in corporate and medical settings. He supports the Rhode Island Hospital Medical Simulation Center's operations with his AV expertise and multimedia editing/ production skills.


     

    Administrative Support

     

    Jennifer Taveira is center coordinator at the Rhode Island Hospital Medical Simulation Center. She provides administrative, billing, research and scheduling support for the simulation facility.