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  • Top 10 Pregnancy Myths

    1. pregnancyYou can determine the sex of your baby by the way you are "carrying."
    2. Avoid sleeping on your back, or always sleep on your right side.
    3. If you raise your arms above your head while pregnant, your baby may get the umbilical cord wrapped around its neck.
    4. You should not touch your cat while pregnant.
    5. You should avoid sex and exercise during pregnancy.
    6. You cannot have x-rays and should avoid computers and microwaves.
    7. You shouldn't take baths while you are pregnant.
    8. You are more likely to go into labor if the weather is stormy or if there is a full moon.
    9. Bumpy car rides can trigger labor.
    10. Shortly after the delivery of my baby, I should keep him/her indoors.

     


    1. You can determine the sex of your baby by the way you are "carrying".
      While it is very tempting to think you can predict, without medical technology, whether your new baby will be a boy or a girl, it simply is not the case. The way a woman "carries" her baby is determined by the baby's size and position. A new mom may be carrying high because a baby is large, not because it is a boy or a girl, or vice versa. Sorry ladies, but you are going to have to wait for the ultrasound.
    2. Avoid sleeping on your back, or always sleep on your right side.
      For normal, healthy pregnant women, any sleep position is safe for your baby. So, choose the one that is most comfortable for you.
    3. If you raise your arms above your head while pregnant, your baby may get the umbilical cord wrapped around its neck.
      As a pregnant woman, you can safely raise your arms above your head as often as you like. You can even do the hand motions to the "YMCA" and your baby will be just fine. A wrapped umbilical cord is a result of a baby's activity in the womb and has nothing to do with the activities of the mother. Although it is a frightening statistic that 25 percent of babies suffer from a wrapped umbilical cord, the good news is that nearly all of those babies are successfully delivered and are perfectly healthy.
    4. You should not touch your cat while pregnant.
      There is something to this myth. But, before you get alarmed and evict "Oreo," understand that most interactions with your cat, like petting, cuddling and feeding, are perfectly safe. The only apprehension you should have concerns the litter box. Pregnant women should not handle cat litter due to a parasite that can be found in cat stool. The parasite, called toxoplasma gondii, can cause serious infections in humans and deformities in developing fetuses. Therefore, keep on showering your cat with attention, just have someone else handle the litter box.
    5. You should avoid sex and exercise during pregnancy.
      For a normal pregnant woman, sex and exercise are acceptable, even healthy. Your baby is well protected in your uterus, making sexual intercourse unlikely to cause any problems. And, as long as you stay within the limits of common sense (i.e. don't exercise in extreme heat), moderate exercise is encouraged. Yoga is an exception. You can certainly practice yoga, but there are precautions. If you choose to do yoga, understand that your ligaments and joints are more flexible right now. You are more prone to tearing muscles because of pregnancy hormones that allow the uterus to expand, but also affect all of your connective tissues. If you are new to yoga, be careful that you do not overdo stretching and cause injury. Many doctors recommend that you do not perform any poses on your back after the first trimester as it can cut blood circulation to the uterus. It is always best to get a qualified instructor to show you proper techniques and make sure you are not overextending yourself. It is only during a complicated pregnancy that your doctor may ask you to abstain from sex or limit exercise.
    6. You cannot have x-rays and should avoid computers, microwaves and cell phones.
      While it is a good idea to avoid unnecessary radiation while you are pregnant, if there is a good reason for an x-ray, you shouldn't be concerned about having it done. The amount of radiation that an x-ray would expose your baby to is minimal. As for microwaves and computer terminals, there is no evidence that these are harmful to your baby. There have been studies that link cellular radiation to defects in unborn chicken embryos. But, the amount of radiation used in studies like there are exponentially larger than what a cell phone would emit. The CDC has found no link between cell phone use and pregnancy problems. Most physicians would not be concerned because the radiation level is so low.
    7. You shouldn't take baths or go swimming while you are pregnant.
      There is no medical evidence supporting the claim that bathing or swimming is bad for pregnant women. The myth appears to stem from the concern that a woman could contract an infection from the water and it could spread to her womb. There is no medical basis for this concern. As long as you maintain a reasonable water temperature (your body temperature should not exceed 101 degrees), break out your rubber ducky.
    8. You are more likely to go into labor if the weather is stormy or if there is a full moon.
      Studies demonstrate that there is no connection between a full moon and your labor date. The weather also does not affect your labor. Labor is triggered by a complicated series of hormonal signals, not by any phase of the moon or weather pattern.
    9. Bumpy car rides can trigger labor.
      Excluding a serious accident, the normal bumps and jolts experienced during a car ride are safe for your baby. Your uterus and its surrounding fluids provide ample protection of your precious cargo. Your body is the best car seat you could ever provide, so stop worrying.
    10. Shortly after the delivery of your baby, you should keep him/her indoors.
      Many people believe that in the first few months your baby should be kept indoors. Though you may get concerned looks from uninformed passersby, it is not detrimental for your infant to be outside during this time as long as he or she is properly dressed and not exposed to extreme weather. Having said that, though the weather is not a concern for your infant, exposure to germs is something to take into consideration whether your baby is indoors or outdoors. Your baby already has an impressive immune system, but it is not as developed as an older child or adult. Keeping your baby away from people who you know have a contagious illness is always the best policy. Keep the touching of your baby to a minimum and only allow those who have thoroughly washed their hands. Try to avoid crowds during the first month or so. But, beside these common sense precautions, you and your baby should be enjoying the benefits of the fresh air.