Current Active Grants

Adherence to Self-paced vs. Prescribed Intensity Physical Activity: Exploring Mechanisms via Ecological Momentary Assessment

This study compares adherence to self-paced intensity and prescribed moderate intensity walking programs, and explores acute affective response to exercise as a predictor of treatment outcomes through use of ecological momentary assessment.  

Principal Investigators: Joseph Fava, PhD (Subcontract) and David Williams, PhD (Project PI)

Funding Agency: National Cancer Institute

Dates: 2009 - 2011


Linking Biophysical Functions of Microbicides to User Perception and Acceptability

This is a project funded through the NIH's Microbicide Innovation Program (MIP). The goal of this study is to explore the potential correspondence between specific omnibus measures of microbicide formulation properties and rheology and similarly omnibus scale measures of women's experiences with those formulations. Using qualitative methods, quantitative scale items were generated and are now being evaluated. A link between biophysical properties and user evaluation of vaginal products would allow the co-optimization of drug deployment and product acceptability, ultimately leading to highly effective anti-HIV topical vaginal microbicides.

 

Principal Investigator: Kathleen M. Morrow, PhD

Co-Investigators: David Katz, PhD; Patrick Kiser, PhD; Joseph Fava, PhD; Rochelle Rosen, PhD; Erna (Milu) Kojic, MD; Lori Panther, MD

Funding Agency: National Institute of Mental Health

Dates: 2006 - 2011


Long-acting Acceptable Microbicides: Novel Delivery, Activity and Pharmacodynamics

This project is funded under NIAID's "Integrated Preclinical/Clinical Program for HIV Topical Microbicides" (U19) mechanism. The overall project aims to develop, evaluate and progress new anti-HIV compounds and novel delivery systems through the microbicide pipeline. Specifically, compounds that inhibit viral entry, attachment, and reverse transcription will be tested and developed in novel forms (i.e., long-acting vaginal gels and intravaginal rings). Project 3 (Dr. Morrow, PI) is responsible for developing instruments to measure factors related to product acceptability and use, and optimize potential acceptability and use of the products developed in this research.

Principal Investigator: Kathleen M. Morrow, PhD (PI: Project 3)

Co-Investigators: Robert Buckheit, PhD (PI: U19, and Core A & C); David Katz, PhD (PI: Project 2); Patrick Kiser, PhD (PI: Project 1); Charlene Dezzutti, PhD (PI: Core D); Todd Parsley, PhD (PI: Core B); Lisa Rohan, PhD (Co-PI: Project 2); Joseph Fava, PhD (Co-I: Project 3); Rochelle Rosen, PhD (Co-I: Project 3)

Funding Agency: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

Dates: 2008 - 2013


Evaluation of the Behavioral Measures of Acceptability of Two Vaginal Gels (CONRAD Project LINK)

The goal of this study is to evaluate novel vaginal gel formulations and the potential correspondence between formulation properties and rheology and measures of women's experiences with those formulations. A link between biophysical properties and user evaluation of vaginal products would allow the co-optimization of drug deployment and product acceptability, ultimately leading to highly effective anti-HIV topical vaginal microbicides.

Principal Investigator: Kathleen M. Morrow, PhD

Co-Investigators: David Katz, PhD, Patrick Kiser, PhD, Joseph L. Fava, PhD, Rochelle Rosen, PhD, Erna (Milu) Kojic, MD, Lori Panther, MD

Funding Agency: CONRAD

Dates: 2009 - 2010


Increasing Sleep Duration: A Novel Approach to Weight Control

The goal of the project is to translate the basic science on sleep duration into a novel intervention to reduce obesity and obesity-related co-morbidities.

Principal Investigator: Rena Wing, PhD

Co-Investigators: Dale Bond, PhD, Mary Carskadon, PhD, Robert Considine, PhD, Ron Cohen, PhD, Joseph Fava PhD, Chantelle Hart, PhD, Jeanne McCaffery, PhD, Richard Millman, MD, George Papandonatos, PhD, Donn Posner, PhD, Hollie Raynor, PhD, Katherine Sharkey, MD, and Larry Sweet, PhD

Funding Agency: The National Cancer Institute

Dates: 2009 - 2014


Sleep Duration and Pediatric Overweight: The Role of Eating Behaviors

This grant examines whether changing sleep duration in school-age children is associated with changes in leptin and ghrelin, the reinforcing value of food, and eating and activity behaviors. (1-09-JF-22)

Principal Investigator: Chantelle Hart, PhD

Co-Investigators: Mary Carskadon, PhD, Joseph Fava, PhD, Elissa Jelalian, PhD, & Judith Owens, MD

Funding Agency: American Diabetes Association

Dates: 2009 - 2011


Examining a Text Message Intervention for Smoking Cessation

Most smokers want to quit and nearly half attempt to quit each year. However, few actually succeed.  The problem is particularly acute among young adult smokers who tend to under-utilize existing smoking cessation services, and have limited access to health insurance and healthcare.  New, innovative approaches are needed that can reach out to younger adult smokers and help them quit.  Intervention delivery modalities that can be inexpensively delivered in an appealing format with wide reach are particularly compelling for treating younger smokers.  For this project we will develop and test a theoretically driven, evidence-based smoking cessation counseling intervention that can be delivered through SMS text messages.  Text messaging is popular with younger adults (<35 years), over half of whom use text messaging, often sending 50 or more messages per week.  Text messaging can be used to provide advice and interactive support adapted from evidence-based interventions for smoking cessation. However, thus far text messaging is an untapped medium and has been only rarely studied as an intervention delivery tool.  Existing studies have significant limitations which the proposed study will attempt to redress.

Principal Investigator: Beth Bock, PhD

Co-Investigators:Joseph Fava, PhD and Kathleen Morrow, PhD

             
Funding Agency: National Institute on Drug Abuse

Dates: 2009 - 2011


Yoga for Women Attempting Smoking Cessation: An Initial Investigation

This study examines the feasibility and initial efficacy of yoga as an adjunct for smoking cessation treatment for women. Women smokers (n=60) will participate in a group-based CBT smoking cessation program and will be randomly assigned to either (1) a twice-weekly yoga program or (2) a wellness (contact control) program.

Principal Investigator: Beth Bock, PhD

Co-Investigators: Bess Marcus, PhD; David Williams, PhD; Bruce Becker, MD, MPH; Geoffrey Tremont, PhD; Kathleen Morrow, PhD; and Joseph Fava, PhD

    
Funding Agency: National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

2009 - 2010