Bradley Online Learning offers computer-based continuing education for professionals in a variety of disciplines, including psychologists, social workers, certified counselors, physicians, nurses, speech/language and occupational therapists, and teachers.

Courses are available through our computer learning management system, complete with a self-registration, payment portal, post-test function, evaluation, and certificate download. To learn more and to register, visit our website at bradleyonlinelearning.org, or choose a course below.

Available Courses

Adherence Challenges: Strategies for Providers

Course Details

  • The target audience for this course is psychologists, physicians, social workers and other interested health care professionals.
  • The instruction level for this course is intermediate.
  • 1 CE hour/credit
  • This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation criteria and policies of the Rhode Island Medical Society (RIMS) through the joint providership of Rhode Island Hospital and Bradley Hospital. Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • Rhode Island Hospital designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.
  • Rhode Island Hospital is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Rhode Island Hospital maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • CEUs for this event have been approved by the National Board for Social Work (NASW) in Rhode Island, designating this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 continuing education credit for certified counselors, marriage and family therapists. Approval #RI-6782.

Presented by

Kristie Puster, PhD
Psychologist, Outpatient Practice

Kristie Puster, PhD, received her bachelor's degree from Baylor University and her doctorate in clinical community psychology from the University of South Carolina. She completed her pre-doctoral internship at Texas Children's Hospital through the Baylor College of Medicine and her post-doctoral fellowship at Brown University Medical School. After spending eleven years as an outpatient practitioner working with pediatric subspecialty clinics in Asheville, North Carolina, she returned to New England to work at Hasbro Children's Hospital as a psychologist in the medical psychiatric inpatient unit. In addition to treating children and adolescents, she provides supervision and training to psychology and psychiatry residents and fellows. At home, she provides supervision and training (with a healthy dose of love thrown in) to her two daughters, a dog, a cat, and a lovebird with the help of her wonderful husband.

About this Course

Adherence to medical and behavioral regimens in children and adolescents with any illness is crucial to maintaining and improving their physical and mental health. However, assisting children and their families in this area can be challenging. This module provides a description of challenges and areas for intervention to improve adherence, including provider, individual, family, school, and peer systems. It further describes and illustrates techniques such as monitoring and incentives; parent training and family systems interventions; facilitation of communication between home, school, and providers; problem solving; and peer support.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Restate the rational for assessing and improving adherence to prescribed medical regimens in psychotherapeutic contexts.
  2. Identify and describe areas for intervention within adherence challenges, including provider, family, school, and peer systems.
  3. Develop strategies of intervention for adherence challenges such as self- and parent- monitoring, parent training and family systems techniques, home-school communication strategies, and peer support facilitation.

Learn More and Register

Choose a version of this course for more information and to register online:

CEU Course for Psychologists CME/CEU Credit Course

Autism in Infancy: Advances and Implications for Clinical Practice

Course Details

  • The target audience for this course is psychologists, physicians, social workers and other interested health care professionals.
  • The instruction level for this course is intermediate.
  • 1 CE hour/credit
  • This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation criteria and policies of the Rhode Island Medical Society (RIMS) through the joint providership of Rhode Island Hospital and Bradley Hospital. Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • Rhode Island Hospital designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 
  • Rhode Island Hospital is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Rhode Island Hospital maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • CEUs for this event have been approved by the National Board for Social Work (NASW) in Rhode Island, designating this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 continuing education credit for certified counselors, marriage and family therapists. 

Stephen J. Sheinkopf, PhD, Director, Rhode Island Consortium for Autism Research and TreatmentPresented by

Stephen J. Sheinkopf, PhD
Director, Rhode Island Consortium for Autism Research and Treatment
Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Stephen J. Sheinkopf, PhD is a graduate of Tufts University and holds a PhD in clinical psychology from the University of Miami. Dr. Sheinkopf completed his internship and postdoctoral training at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.  He works as both a clinician and a researcher with expertise in the area of autism and developmental disabilities. His research addresses the early development of children with autism and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), including infant signs of risk for ASD and the development of language and social behaviors in ASD. Sheinkopf’s clinical service is focused on the early diagnosis and clinical management of autism. He is director of the Rhode Island Consortium for Autism Research and Treatment.

About this Course

This article provides a brief overview of the state of knowledge regarding the presentation of autism in infancy, and includes case examples derived from composites of patients seen in an early diagnostic evaluation and follow up clinic. Autism is a condition that can be severe by early childhood, by which time symptoms are clearly present. However, even for children whose condition emerges as being severe, the presentation in infancy is most often subtle, making early detection very challenging. This has implications for research, as well as for clinicians, who are involved in early screening and diagnosis.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe research on early behavioral presentation of autism in infancy.
  2. Recognize the challenges for sensitivity and specificity of clinical diagnostic impressions at very young ages.
  3. Indicate options for longitudinal follow up to enhance accuracy of screening and diagnosis.

Learn More and Register

Choose a version of this course for more information and to register online:

CEU Course for Psychologists CME/CEU Credit Course

Bases De La Salud Social Y Emocional Y Del Desarrollo Del Bebe /Nino Pequeno Para Padres - Disenado Especialmente Para Padres Y Familias

El desarrollo social y emocional y del desarrollo de bebés y niños pequeños es la base de todo el desarrollo e implica la capacidad de un bebé de expresar y regular las emociones, formar relaciones positivas con otras personas y explorar y aprender ávidamente. Durante los 3 primeros años de vida, el cerebro de un bebé se desarrolla más rápidamente que en cualquier otro momento. Este desarrollo toma forma con las experiencias del bebé con sus padres (y otros familiares cercanos); las primeras experiencias de su bebé con usted son importantes y duran toda la vida.

El curso Bases de Bradley incluye 10 módulos basados en computadora que ofrecen información sobre el desarrollo social y emocional y del desarrollo de un bebé y destaca la importancia de las experiencias de relaciones positivas tempranas para un desarrollo saludable.

Aprenda más y Regístrese

Haga clic a continuación para obtener más información y para registrarse en línea:

Aprenda más y Regístrese

Brief Behavioral Interventions with Non-English-Speaking Parents of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Global Deficits in ASD Services Among Non-English-Speaking Families

Course Details

  • The target audience for this course is psychologists, physicians, social workers and other interested health care professionals.
  • The instructional level of this course is intermediate.
  • 1 CE hour/credit
  • This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation criteria and policies of the Rhode Island Medical Society (RIMS) through the joint providership of Rhode Island Hospital and Bradley Hospital. Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • Rhode Island Hospital designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 
  • Rhode Island Hospital is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Rhode Island Hospital maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • CEUs for this event have been approved by the National Board for Social Work (NASW) in Rhode Island, designating this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 continuing education credit for certified counselors, marriage and family therapists. Approval #RI-6776.

Presented by

Karyn K. Blane, PsyD
Director, Intensive Behavioral Treatment Program, Emma Pendleton Bradley Hospital
Associate Professor (Clinical), Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

For more than twenty years, Dr. Blane has served on the clinical staff at Bradley Hospital and as a member of the department of psychiatry and human behavior at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. Dr. Blane’s clinical and research interests focus on the advancements of effective treatment of autism both locally and globally. Prior to coming to Rhode Island, Dr. Blane received her BA in psychology from the University of Pennsylvania, and her MA in clinical practices and PsyD from the University of Hartford. 

Dr. Blane is currently director of the Intensive Behavioral Treatment (IBT) Program at Bradley Hospital, providing in-home clinical, applied behavior analytic, and consultative services to children and families managing the difficulties associated with autism spectrum disorders. She is also a clinical associate professor of psychiatry and human behavior at The Alpert Medical School of Brown University, publishing in the areas of developmental disabilities and autism research and treatment, and supervising and lecturing residents and postdoctoral fellows in The Alpert Medical School. 

Dr. Blane’s extensive experience spans the globe, as she was invited to present at an international seminar on autism diagnostics, treatment and interventions in Sao Miguel, Portugal, and also at the World Association of Social Psychiatry Convention in London, England. In recognition of her ongoing contributions to the department of psychiatry and human behavior, Dr. Blane was honored to receive the Dean’s Excellence in Teaching Award. She enjoys sharing her passion for the exploration of alternative home and school-based interventions for children with autism across cultures. 

Ashley Johnson Harrison, PhD
The University of Georgia, Athens

Ashley Harrison, PhD graduated from Binghamton University with a degree in clinical psychology. She completed both her Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC) pre-doctoral internship and a two-year US National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded T32 post-doctoral fellowship at the Clinical Psychology Training Consortium at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University. Dr. Harrison is currently an assistant professor at the University of Georgia in the school psychology program within the department of educational psychology. Dr. Harrison’s research focuses on two areas related to autism spectrum disorders (ASD): assessing attention impairment among children diagnosed with ASD and adapting and disseminating best-practice assessment and treatment approaches for cross-cultural use. Dr. Harrison was trained in behavioral and cognitive behavioral therapies and has extensive experience conducting ASD diagnostic evaluations and providing behavioral interventions for families and children with ASD.

Kristin A. Long, PhD
Boston University, Boston

Kristin Long, PhD, is an assistant professor in the department of psychological and brain sciences at Boston University, where she is the director of the Child and Family Health Lab. She earned her doctoral degree in clinical and bio-health psychology from the University of Pittsburgh and completed her clinical internship and postdoctoral fellowship training at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University in Providence, RI. Dr. Long’s research employs qualitative, quantitative, and community-based methods to examine developmental, cultural, and family influences on child health. She has carried out her research primarily in the context of childhood cancer, asthma, autism, intellectual disability, and adolescent sexual risk. Dr. Long is a licensed clinical psychologist in Massachusetts and Rhode Island and has experience developing and delivering psychotherapy interventions for individuals, families, and groups across outpatient, inpatient, medical, school, and forensic settings. In her current position at Boston University, Dr. Long is involved in undergraduate and graduate teaching as well as research and clinical training.

About this Course

This module will provide an overview of the global need for autism education and treatment services as well as of the barriers to accessing and providing them. A brief, parent-mediated intervention will be discussed, with implications for improving services both locally and globally. This should allow for the development of a greater appreciation for the need to enhance understanding of the autism diagnosis and treatment options.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Recognize the barriers to autism knowledge and treatment in Africa.
  2. Describe the benefits of providing a brief, behavior based intervention for children and families managing the difficulties associated with autism.
  3. Recognize and outline methods to empower parents across countries to help their children. 

Learn More and Register

Choose a version of this course for more information and to register online:

CEU Course for Psychologists CME/CEU Credit Course

Considering the Children of Parents with Mental Illness: Impact on Behavioral and Social Functioning

Course Details

  • The target audience for this course is psychologists, physicians, social workers and other interested health care professionals.
  • The instructional level of this course is intermediate.
  • 1 CE hour/credit. 
  • This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation criteria and policies of the Rhode Island Medical Society (RIMS) through the joint providership of Rhode Island Hospital and Bradley Hospital. Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians. 
  • Rhode Island Hospital designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 
  • Rhode Island Hospital is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Rhode Island Hospital maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • CEUs for this event have been approved by the National Board for Social Work (NASW) in Rhode Island, designating this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 continuing education credit for certified counselors, marriage and family therapists. Approval #RI-6779.

Presented by

G. Oana Costea, MD
Director, Children’s Program, Bradley Hospital
Associate Professor (Clinical), Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Dr. Costea is a clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and human behavior at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University and has staff appointments at Bradley and Rhode Island Hospitals. Dr. Costea has been the director of the children’s inpatient program for nine years providing care to children with severe emotional and behavioral disturbances. As part of her work on an acute inpatient unit, Dr. Costea has provided pharmacological management for children with emotional and behavioral disorders that otherwise would not respond or would have limited response to therapeutic interventions. Additionally, working with families in a state of crisis and caregivers with their own emotional disorders with focus on stabilizing the entire family system has been a core component of Dr. Costea’s clinical work. 

About this Course

In the context of increased availability of community-based mental health treatment, rehabilitation programs, and advances in psychopharmacology, more patients with serious mental illness are now parents, many with young children. Consequently, there has been increased attention toward the potential impact on children of parental mental illness. The module discusses the protective and risk factors influencing the impact of parental mental illness on child outcomes, including biological, illness-related, environmental, and child-related factors. Additionally, both adult- and child-focused interventions that could optimize the child outcomes are reviewed.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe factors influencing the impact of parental mental illness on child outcomes.
  2. Describe therapeutic interventions that foster positive child outcomes.

Learn More and Register

Choose a version of this course for more information and to register online:

CEU Course for Psychologists CME/CEU Credit Course

Contemporary Commentary Series

Each of the following modules contains three commentaries which focus on topics in pediatric social emotional development, treatment, practice, provider training, research or public policy. The commentaries originally appeared in the Brown University Child and Adolescent Behavior Letter.

Courses are available through our computer learning management system, complete with a self-registration, payment portal, post-test function, evaluation, and certificate download.

Learn more

Conversion Disorder: Helping Families Understand the Mind-Body Connection

Course Details

  • The target audience for this course is psychologists, physicians, social workers and other interested health care professionals.
  • The instruction level for this course is intermediate.
  • 1 CE hour/credit
  • This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation criteria and policies of the Rhode Island Medical Society (RIMS) through the joint providership of Rhode Island Hospital and Bradley Hospital. Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • Rhode Island Hospital designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 
  • Rhode Island Hospital is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Rhode Island Hospital maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • CEUs for this event have been approved by the National Board for Social Work (NASW) in Rhode Island, designating this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 continuing education credit for certified counselors, marriage and family therapists. 

Rebecca Laptook, PhD, Staff Psychologist, Hasbro Children’s Partial Hospital Program Presented by

Rebecca Laptook, PhD
Staff Psychologist, Hasbro Children’s Partial Hospital Program
Assistant Professor (Clinical) of Psychiatry and Human Behavior as well as Assistant Professor (Clinical) of Pediatrics, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Rebecca Laptook, PhD, received her doctorate in clinical psychology from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. She completed an internship at NY Presbyterian-Columbia University Medical School and a subsequent child postdoctoral fellowship at North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System. Dr. Laptook is a staff psychologist at the Hasbro Children's Partial Hospital Program and, as part of the multidisciplinary team, provides individual, family, and group therapy to children and adolescents presenting with combined medical and psychiatric illnesses. Additionally, she is engaged in various supervisory, teaching, and research activities as part of the partial hospital program as well as coordinates educational programming for staff, trainees, and the larger psychology department. Dr. Laptook has also worked with children and families in the outpatient clinic of the Department of Child and Family Psychiatry and has a particular interest and expertise in childhood anxiety, selective mutism, child temperament, and parent-child interactions.

About this Course

This presentation will provide a broad overview of conversion disorder with an emphasis of how to understand it in terms of the mind-body connection. In particular, the importance of the role of medical providers and the language that is used to help families understand the diagnosis will be discussed. This presentation will aim to help providers develop a better understanding of both the barriers that lead to families not progressing in treatment as well as the supports needed to help families accept a diagnosis and treatment approach for conversion disorder.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Define conversion disorder.
  2. Describe how conversion disorder can be understood as a “mind-body” connection.
  3. List two examples of how to help patients and families understand similar examples of psychological factors manifesting as physical symptoms.

Learn More and Register

Choose a version of this course for more information and to register online:

CEU Course for Psychologists CME/CEU Credit Course

DSM 5 Updates for Eating Disorders: Implications for Diagnosis and Clinical Practice

Course Details

  • The target audience for this course is psychologists, physicians, social workers and other interested health care professionals.
  • The instructional level of this course is intermediate.
  • 1 CE hour/credit
  • This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation criteria and policies of the Rhode Island Medical Society (RIMS) through the joint providership of Rhode Island Hospital and Bradley Hospital. Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • Rhode Island Hospital designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 
  • Rhode Island Hospital is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Rhode Island Hospital maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • CEUs for this event have been approved by the National Board for Social Work (NASW) in Rhode Island, designating this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 continuing education credit for certified counselors, marriage and family therapists. Approval #RI-6777.

Presented byMannix

Margaret Mannix, PhD
Staff Psychologist, Rhode Island Hospital, Division of Child and Family Psychiatry, Hasbro Children’s Partial Hospital Program
Assistant Professor (Clinical), Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior and Pediatrics, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Dr. Mannix is a pediatric psychologist who works primarily with children and families who have both medical issues and psychological concerns. She earned her doctorate in clinical psychology, with a specialization in health psychology, from Yeshiva University in 2009. She completed an internship in child clinical psychology at the Franciscan Hospital for Children, and a fellowship in pediatric psychology at Brown Medical School in 2010. She currently provides clinical services to the Hasbro Partial Hospital Program as well as the Rhode Island Hospital department of outpatient psychiatry. Dr. Mannix participates in the training of interns, residents, and fellows in psychology, psychiatry, and pediatrics. Her primary research interest is coping with chronic illness, especially pediatric cancer.

About this Course

The DSM-5 updates to the eating disorder category have several implications for diagnosis and clinical care. Research ahead of the updated guidelines emphasized the high prevalence of eating disorder-NOS diagnoses, whether binge eating disorder is a valid diagnosis, whether amenorrhea should be a criterion for anorexia nervosa (AN), and the frequency of behaviors required for bulimia nervosa. DSM-5 updates may result in more individuals being diagnosed with AN versus ED-NOS. Overall, changes have the potential to improve treatment guidelines for all patients with eating disorders and to significantly further our knowledge as providers and researchers.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. State how DMS 5 changes to the eating disorder category will impact clinical practice (diagnosis and treatment)
  2. Describe critical updates to anorexia nervosa diagnostic criteria
  3. Recognize the newest eating disorder, binge eating disorder (BED), and will be able to distinguish it from bulimia nervosa

Learn More and Register

Choose a version of this course for more information and to register online:

CEU Course for Psychologists CME/CEU Credit Course

Educating Children with Autism: Collaboration Between Parents, Teachers, and Medical Specialists

Course Details

  • The target audience for this course is psychologists, physicians, social workers and other interested health care professionals.
  • The instruction level for this course is intermediate.
  • 1 CE hour/credit
  • This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation criteria and policies of the Rhode Island Medical Society (RIMS) through the joint providership of Rhode Island Hospital and Bradley Hospital. Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • Rhode Island Hospital designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 
  • Rhode Island Hospital is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Rhode Island Hospital maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • CEUs for this event have been approved by the National Board for Social Work (NASW) in Rhode Island, designating this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 continuing education credit for certified counselors, marriage and family therapists. 

Presented by

Trish Martins, MEd
Director of Education, Lifespan School Solutions/Bradley Schools

Trish Martins, MEd is the director of education for Lifespan School Solutions and the Bradley Schools. She received her undergraduate degree in special and elementary education from Rhode Island College, and also received her master’s of education and an administrator of special education certificate from Rhode Island College. She has over 30 years’ experience working as a special education teacher, and a special education coordinator in a public school district, and most recently was a director of special education for a regional program serving four public school districts. She has served on many local and statewide committees regarding education, and has earned recognition as an educator and for program development. Martins frequently presents to groups on varied topics in special education. She has particular interests in creating an optimal educational environment for learners with diverse needs, teaching students with developmental challenges, and integrating social-emotional learning into the school environment.

Karen Cammuso, PhD, ABPP
Karen Cammuso, PhD, ABPP, Board Certified Clinical Child and Adolescent PsychologistBoard Certified Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychologist
Clinical Director, Verrecchia Outpatient Clinic for Children and Adolescents with Developmental Disabilities at Bradley Hospital
Assistant Professor (Clinical), Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, The Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University

Karen Cammuso, PhD, ABPP is a board certified clinical child and adolescent psychologist, and is the clinical director of the Verrecchia Outpatient Clinic for Children and Adolescents with Developmental Disabilities at Bradley Hospital. She earned her doctoral degree in clinical psychology at Catholic University of America, and her undergraduate degree in biology and psychology at Boston College.  

Dr. Cammuso has worked for Bradley Hospital and Bradley Schools for 24 years. She began as coordinator of outpatient services for children with disabilities at Bradley, and then moved to a position as a psychologist at the Bradley School in Portsmouth. She then co-directed a Bradley School Partnership program in the East Providence Public School, and developed the programming for children with developmental disabilities. She then served as a clinical director for Lifespan School Solutions/The Bradley Schools, consulting to all of the Bradley schools regarding clinical aspects of educational services for children with developmental disabilities. She recently returned to Bradley Hospital to start up the new Verrecchia Clinic

Prior to Bradley, Dr. Cammuso worked in a private special education school in Virginia, and provided outpatient care in a private practice in Maryland. Her predoctoral and postdoctoral training at Georgetown University Hospital’s Child Development Center and University of Maryland Hospital focused largely on assessment of developmental disabilities and treatment of comorbid psychiatric conditions.

About this Course

This presentation will provide an overview of the process of autism diagnosis, special education eligibility, and parent experience in working with medical and educational professionals. A particular goal is to inform clinicians/medical professionals of special education regulations guiding the determination of a child’s eligibility for services, and clarify how they can best provide information that is helpful in that process. A collaborative process between professionals is encouraged in order to best serve children with autism spectrum disorder and their parents.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Recognize the legally mandated process of determining special education eligibility.
  2. Describe a parent’s perspective regarding navigating the system when their child is diagnosed with a developmental disability.
  3. Indicate how to give feedback and recommendations in a manner that is helpful to educational teams working with children with Autism spectrum disorders.

Learn More and Register

Choose a version of this course for more information and to register online:

CEU Course for Psychologists CME/CEU Credit Course

Foundations for Infant/Toddler Social Emotional Health and Development: Designed for Providers

Course Details

  • The target audience for this course is psychologists, physicians, social workers and other interested health care professionals.
  • The instruction level for this course is beginner.
  • 5 CE hours/credits
  • This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation criteria and policies of the Rhode Island Medical Society (RIMS) through the joint providership of Rhode Island Hospital and Bradley Hospital. Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • Rhode Island Hospital designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 5.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.
  • Rhode Island Hospital is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Rhode Island Hospital maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • CEUs for this event have been approved by the National Board for Social Work (NASW) in Rhode Island, designating this live activity for a maximum of 5.0 continuing education credits for certified counselors, marriage and family therapists. Approval #RI-6784.

Susan Dickstein, PhDPresented By 

Susan Dickstein, PhD
Director of the Bradley Hospital Early Childhood Clinical Research Center, Bradley Hospital
Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Dr. Dickstein, as director of the Bradley Hospital Early Childhood Clinical Research Center (part of the Bradley Hasbro Children’s Research Center) for two decades, collaborated on several US National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants within the realm of developmental psychopathology, attachment theory, family risk, maternal depression, and early childhood mental health, and assessment of child outcomes in Head Start, and was co-principal investigator on a SAMHSA systems initiative, Project RI LAUNCH–aimed at building social-behavioral capacities into pediatric and child care systems to promote and integrate physical and behavioral health wellness. Dr. Dickstein is consulting editor for the Journal of Family Psychology and the Infant Mental Health Journal, and developed an online training course, "Foundations for Infant/Toddler Social Emotional Health: Provider Modules," designed to support those who work with infants/toddlers in promoting infant mental health. Currently, Dr. Dickstein focuses on integration of infant mental health principles and practices within community organizations that provide infant/early childhood service and advocacy.

Dr. Dickstein serves on various advisory committees in Rhode Island on behalf of vulnerable infants, toddlers and families including Successful Start (Rhode Island’s early childhood comprehensive systems initiative), the Governor’s Early Learning Council, Rhode Island Association for Infant Mental Health (founding member and president), and the Office of the Child Advocate Advisory Committee. She is involved at a national level as a member of the World Association for Infant Mental Health, and as a founding partner of the national Alliance for the Advancement of Infant Mental Health. Dr. Dickstein is a licensed clinical psychologist, and is endorsed as an Infant Mental Health Clinical Mentor (Level IV), an internationally recognized designation.

About this Course

The earliest interactions that babies have with parents and caregivers determine the health of a baby’s mind, body, behavior, and relationships for the rest of life.

This course augments work completed by the National Infant and Toddler Child Care Initiative at Zero to Three, a project of the federal Child Care Bureau. Bradley’s "Foundations" course offers high-quality professional development for front-line providers across various community sectors that serve infants, toddlers, and their families.

The course includes 16 computer-based learning (CBL) modules in three sections:

  • Infant/Toddler Development
  • Relationships as the Context for Development
  • Supporting Infant/Toddler Development: Approaches to Individualization

The modules are embedded in a learning management system complete with self registration, payment portal, post-test function, evaluation and certificate download. Bradley’s “Foundations for Providers” course is an approved online training opportunity to support application for Endorsement for Culturally Sensitive, Relationship-Focused Practice Promoting Infant Mental Health®.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Recognize key findings from science related to early social emotional health and development.
  2. Explain centrality of attachment relationships in infant/toddler development.
  3. Identify the importance of partnering with families to foster relationships that support understanding of each child’s individual developmental strengths and needs.

Learn More and Register

Choose a version of this course for more information and to register online:

CEU Course for Psychologists CME/CEU Credit Course Non-Credit Course

Foundations of Infant and Toddler Social Emotional Health and Development: Designed Especially for Parents and Family

Infant and Toddler social emotional health and development is a foundation of all development, involving a baby’s ability to express and regulate emotions, form positive relationships with others, and eagerly explore and learn. During the first 3 years of life, a baby’s brain develops more rapidly than at any other time. This development is shaped by the baby’s experiences with parents (and other primary family members)—your baby’s early experiences with you matter, and they last a lifetime.

Bradley’s Foundations course includes 10 computer-based modules that offer insights about a baby’s social emotional health and development, and it highlights the importance of positive early relationship experiences for healthy development. 

Learn More and Register

Click below for more information and to register online:

Learn more and Register 

Home and Community Based Mental Health Services for Youth: Is It Working?

Course Details

  • The target audience for this course is psychologists, physicians, social workers and other interested health care professionals
  • The instructional level of this course is intermediate.
  • 1 CE hour/credit. 
  • This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation criteria and policies of the Rhode Island Medical Society (RIMS) through the joint providership of Rhode Island Hospital and Bradley Hospital. Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • Rhode Island Hospital designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 
  • Rhode Island Hospital is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Rhode Island Hospital maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • CEUs for this event have been approved by the National Board for Social Work (NASW) in Rhode Island, designating this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 continuing education credit for certified counselors, marriage and family therapists. Approval #RI-6783.

LichtensteinPresented by

David P. Lichtenstein, PhD
Staff Psychologist, Bradley School North, Lifespan School Solutions
Assistant Professor (Clinical), Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Dr. Lichtenstein has been working in the child development and mental health field for nearly twenty years, with extensive experience in both school- and community-based programs for children. He holds a doctoral and master’s degree in counseling psychology from the University of Oregon and an undergraduate degree from Brown University.
 
As a licensed psychologist, Dr. Lichtenstein is currently a classroom team leader and staff psychologist for Lifespan School Solutions, a private non-profit that serves students with emotional, psychiatric, and developmental difficulties in both public and independent schools. He also holds an appointment as a clinical assistant professor at the Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University. His previous positions include a role as a clinician in children’s intensive services (home-based programming) as well as outpatient community mental health. He has published in the areas of mental health, substance abuse, and student development.

About this Course

This module investigates the promise and pitfalls of home-based mental health services for youth. It briefly reviews the theory behind home-based services, then uses two very different examples to examine the effectiveness of these services. The evidence base is reviewed for a rigorously tested, university-developed program (multisystemic therapy) as well as for a community-based program developed by local providers (children’s intensive services in Rhode Island). The module raises questions about how well these programs are meeting their stated objectives, and concludes by summing up the significant challenges that remain in serving children and families.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the potential benefits of home-based services for children and families.
  2. Recognize what data are available, and what the data tell us, about two very different forms of home-based services for children and families.
  3. Recognize the implications of the existing evidence base for future research and development of home-based programming.

Learn More and Register

Choose a version of this course for more information and to register online:

CEU Course for Psychologists CME/CEU Credit Course

How DBT-A in Residential Treatment Facilities May Help to Overcome Caregiver Burden

Course Details

  • The target audience for this course is psychologists, physicians, social workers and other interested health care professionals.
  • The instruction level for this course is intermediate.
  • 1 CE hour/credit
  • This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation criteria and policies of the Rhode Island Medical Society (RIMS) through the joint providership of Rhode Island Hospital and Bradley Hospital. Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • Rhode Island Hospital designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 
  • Rhode Island Hospital is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Rhode Island Hospital maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • CEUs for this event have been approved by the National Board for Social Work (NASW) in Rhode Island, designating this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 continuing education credit for certified counselors, marriage and family therapists. 

Presented by

Janine Galione, PhD
Postdoctoral Fellow Bradley
Hospital- Outpatient Department
The Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University

Janine Galione, PhD is a licensed clinical psychologist serving in the outpatient department at Bradley Hospital. Dr. Galione earned her undergraduate degree at the University of Miami and completed her doctoral work in clinical psychology from Washington University in St. Louis. She spent her internship and postdoctoral fellowship training in dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) at the Center for Behavioral Medicine in Kansas City and The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, respectively. Galione currently splits her time between clinical practice and research. She serves as a clinician for Mindful Teen, an outpatient DBT program targeting suicide and self-harm behaviors in multi-problem youth. Her research interests broadly include interpersonal sensitivity, personality pathology, and suicide risk in LGBQ youth. Galione is currently involved in Dr. Nicole Nugent’s National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) project investigating biomarkers, social, and affective predictors of suicidal thoughts and behaviors in adolescents.

Kerri L Kim, PhD Kerri L Kim, PhD, Clinical Psychologist and DBT Program Manager, Bradley Hospital
Clinical Psychologist and DBT Program Manager, Bradley Hospital

Kerri L. Kim, PhD is a licensed clinical psychologist and DBT Program Manager at Bradley Hospital. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Rhode Island and doctorate from the Clinical Child Psychology Program at the University of Kansas. She completed both her pre-doctoral internship and post-doctoral fellowship at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, DC. The primary goal of Dr. Kim’s clinical and research work is to promote resilience – that is, positive mental health outcomes for children and adolescents experiencing a range of life stressors. 

Amanda Pelletier, LICSW Amanda Pelletier, LICSW, National Institute of Mental Health Clinical Director COMPASS Program, Bradley Hospital
Director, COMPASS Program, Bradley Hospital

Amanda Pelletier is a licensed independent clinical social worker. She is currently the clinical director of the Compass Program, a Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Adolescents (DBT-A) residential treatment program. 

About this Course

This presentation will highlight the need for family involvement in residential treatment facilities, and specifically focuses on the advantages of implementing DBT-A as an evidence based model for residential programs. The paper will discuss factors that lead to caregiver burden among multi-problem youth with self-destructive behaviors, while also introducing the concept of validation and parent training in other DBT-A skills as means for diminishing the impact of burnout.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Explain how DBT-A adapts to residential treatment facilities and targets family conflicts.
  2. Describe effective validation strategies to reduce caregiver burnout in residential programs.
  3. Recognize the benefits of increasing family involvement in adolescent residential programs.

Learn More and Register

Choose a version of this course for more information and to register online:

CEU Course for Psychologists CME/CEU Credit Course

Medical Comorbidities in Autism Spectrum Disorder

Course Details

  • The target audience for this course is psychologists, physicians, social workers and other interested health care professionals.
  • The instruction level for this course is intermediate.
  • 1 CE hour/credit
  • This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation criteria and policies of the Rhode Island Medical Society (RIMS) through the joint providership of Rhode Island Hospital and Bradley Hospital. Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • Rhode Island Hospital designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 
  • Rhode Island Hospital is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Rhode Island Hospital maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • CEUs for this event have been approved by the National Board for Social Work (NASW) in Rhode Island, designating this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 continuing education credit for certified counselors, marriage and family therapists. 

Margaret Mannix, PhD, Staff Psychologist,  Rhode Island HospitalPresented by

Margaret Mannix, PhD
Staff Psychologist, Rhode Island Hospital
Division of Child and Family Psychiatry
Assistant Professor, Clinician Educator, Psychiatry and Human Behavior and Pediatrics
The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Margaret Mannix, PhD, received her doctorate in clinical psychology in 2009 from Yeshiva University. She completed her predoctoral internship at the Franciscan Hospital for Children, where she primarily worked with children and families on the medical rehabilitation units. Her fellowship in pediatric psychology at Brown Medical School focused on providing clinical services to the pediatric hematology/oncology department. She currently provides clinical care and resident teaching at the Hasbro Partial Hospital Program and The Tomorrow Fund, Hasbro’s pediatric oncology clinic. She serves on the RI Hospital/Hasbro Ethics Committee and is a board member of The Adolescent Leadership Council (TALC). She is also a court-appointed special advocate (CASA) volunteer.

About this Course

This presentation will provide a brief overview of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5 (DSM-5) changes to the Autism Spectrum Disorder category and will offer a particular focus on medical co-morbidities. Sleep problems, allergies, and GI problems are reviewed in detail. A brief case highlights a patient with ASD and associated GI and nutritional problems. Together, the background information along with the case should allow the learner to develop a greater understanding of diagnostic and treatment complexities in this population. 

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe how children with autisim spectrum disorder are at risk for medical comorbidities..
  2. Recognize two common medical conditions that are comorbid with autisim spectrum Disorder.
  3. Explain the diagnostic complexity in autisim spectrum disorder.

Learn More and Register

Choose a version of this course for more information and to register online:

CEU Course for Psychologists CME/CEU Credit Course

Preventing Suicide Among Justice-Involved Youth Using Public Health Partnerships

Course Details

  • The target audience for this course is psychologists, physicians, social workers and other interested health care professionals.
  • The instruction level for this course is intermediate.
  • 1 CE hour/credit
  • This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation criteria and policies of the Rhode Island Medical Society (RIMS) through the joint providership of Rhode Island Hospital and Bradley Hospital. Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • Rhode Island Hospital designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 
  • Rhode Island Hospital is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Rhode Island Hospital maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • CEUs for this event have been approved by the National Board for Social Work (NASW) in Rhode Island, designating this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 continuing education credit for certified counselors, marriage and family therapists. 

Presented by

Kathleen Kemp, PhD
Kathleen Kemp, PhD, Staff Psychologist, Rhode Island Hospital Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and Bradley Hasbro Children's Research CenterStaff Psychologist, Rhode Island Hospital Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and Bradley Hasbro Children's Research Center
Director, Rhode Island Family Court Mental Health Clinic Assistant Professor (Research), Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Kathleen Kemp, PhD, is an assistant professor (research) with The Warren Alpert Medical School and a staff psychologist in Rhode Island Hospital's department of child and adolescent psychiatry and the Bradley/Hasbro Children's Research Center. She earned her graduate degree at Drexel University and completed her predoctoral internship at University of Massachusetts Medical School/Worcester State Hospital. Dr. Kemp completed her forensic psychology fellowship at the University of Virginia's Department of Neurobehavioral Science, Institute of Law, Psychiatry, and Public Policy and Western State Hospital. She has extensive training in juvenile forensic assessment with court-involved youth as well as gender-specific interventions with girls in the juvenile justice system. Her clinical research focuses on developmental factors impacting youths' mental health, substance use, and juvenile justice trajectories as well as the translation of evidence-based treatment to the juvenile justice population.

Brittney Poindexter, PhD
Brittney Poindexter, PhD Research Scientist, Rhode Island Hospital Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and Bradley Hasbro Children's Research CenterResearch Scientist, Rhode Island Hospital Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and Bradley Hasbro Children's Research Center
Instructor (Research), Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Brittney Poindexter, PhD received a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Ohio University, and recently received her doctorate degree in psychology from the University of Rhode Island. As an early-career researcher, Dr. Poindexter serves as the project director for multiple NIH-funded studies, including a prospective cohort study exploring the longitudinal developmental course of delinquency, behavioral risk and mental health outcomes among court-involved but non-incarcerated juvenile offenders. She is also an Instructor (Research) within the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. Dr. Poindexter’s research investigates the influence of cultural and socio-contextual factors that contribute to pediatric behavioral and health outcomes, and aims to reduce pediatric health disparities that impact youth in disadvantaged populations.

About this Course

This presentation offers a review of literature that examines the pervasive impact of suicide and suicidal behaviors among populations of juvenile justice-involved youth. The program focuses discussion on methods to screen, identify and address suicidal ideation across the various points of interception within the juvenile justice system. Safety planning is offered as a potential stand-alone brief intervention within juvenile justice settings. This presentation provides an increased knowledge of suicide as a public health issue, and pinpoints the necessity for systems-level partnerships and collaboration among stakeholders in juvenile justice, and public health systems, to create more successful prevention and intervention strategies.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Recognize the pervasive and consistent impact of suicide, and suicidal thoughts and behaviors, on juvenile justice-involved youth.
  2. Evaluate the importance and value of public health systems collaboration with juvenile justice systems to create and implement successful suicide prevention and intervention strategies.
  3. Describe safety planning, and the utility of this intervention in juvenile justice settings.

Learn More and Register

Choose a version of this course for more information and to register online:

CEU Course for Psychologists CME/CEU Credit Course

Psychodynamic Perspectives on Psychotropic Medications for Children and Adolescents

Course Details

  • The target audience for this course is psychologists, physicians, social workers and other interested health care professionals.
  • The instruction level for this course is intermediate.
  • 1 CE hour/credit
  • This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation criteria and policies of the Rhode Island Medical Society (RIMS) through the joint providership of Rhode Island Hospital and Bradley Hospital. Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • Rhode Island Hospital designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 
  • Rhode Island Hospital is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Rhode Island Hospital maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • CEUs for this event have been approved by the National Board for Social Work (NASW) in Rhode Island, designating this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 continuing education credit for certified counselors, marriage and family therapists.

Horacio Hojman, MD, Outpatient Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, Child and Family Psychiatry, Rhode Island HospitalPresented by

Horacio Hojman, MD

Outpatient Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, Child and Family Psychiatry, Rhode Island Hospital
Associate Professor (Clinical), Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Horacio Hojman, MD has more than 20 years of experience in Outpatient Child Psychiatry working with diverse populations in the practice of Hospital, School and Community Psychiatry. He also works with the Latino population in different settings given that he comes from a Hispanic background from Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Dr. Hojman also practices psychodynamic psychotherapy and his specialty area is the interface between Psychotherapy and Psychopharmacology.

He had his Medical Degree from the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina. After his initial residency in General Psychiatry in Buenos Aires, he trained at the Tavistock Clinic in London, England on Adolescent Psychoanalysis and later came to the US where he did his residency in General Psychiatry at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago and at the Massachusetts/McLearn combined program in Boston.

He has been part of Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior since 1997. He has taught General Psychiatry. He also belongs to the Boston Psychoanalytic Institute.

About this Course

The use of medication in children and adolescents has expanded beyond evidence-based practice. Therefore, understanding the meaning of medication may result in better outcomes for children and families.
This article reviews the prescribing of medication to children and adolescents as an individual family and system intervention as well as taking into account the importance of developmental issues for successful prescribing practices and intervention.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe the dynamic meaning of prescribing a medication.
  2. Recognize the complexities created by split treatments.
  3. Recognize that achieving a working alliance guarantees successful prescribing practices and compliance.

Learn More and Register

Choose a version of this course for more information and to register online:

CEU Course for Psychologists CME/CEU Credit Course

Puerto Rico se Levanta: Resilience in Times of Disaster

Course Details

  • The target audience for this course is psychologists, physicians, social workers and other interested health care professionals.
  • The instruction level for this course is intermediate.
  • 1 CE hour/credit
  • This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation criteria and policies of the Rhode Island Medical Society (RIMS) through the joint providership of Rhode Island Hospital and Bradley Hospital. Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • Rhode Island Hospital designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 
  • Rhode Island Hospital is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Rhode Island Hospital maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • CEUs for this event have been approved by the National Board for Social Work (NASW) in Rhode Island, designating this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 continuing education credit for certified counselors, marriage and family therapists. 

Von Maria Rodiguez-Guzman, PhD,   Licensed Clinical Psychologist and T32 Research Fellow, Rhode Island Hospital Presented by

Von Maria Rodriguez-Guzman, PhD

Licensed Clinical Psychologist and T32 Research Fellow, Rhode Island Hospital and The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Von Maria Rodriguez-Guzman, PhD is a licensed clinical psychologist and a T32 research fellow at Rhode Island Hospital and The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

Dr. Rodriguez-Guzman holds a doctoral degree in clinical psychology from Ponce Health Sciences University and an undergraduate degree in psychology from University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez Campus. She is a licensed clinical psychologist in the states of New York and Rhode Island. She completed her pre-doctoral internship and first post-doctoral experience in New York University Lutheran Family Health Centers in Brooklyn.

Dr. Rodriguez-Guzman is currently a T32 research fellow in the child track working on ongoing research examining the ways social context influence post-trauma adjustment in weeks following a traumatic event. Her career has focused in the examination of feasibility of a trauma focused intervention for Latino children and the characterization of health disparities, the role of acculturation and other cultural influences in Latino youth in the aftermath of a trauma.

About this Course

This presentation will provide an introduction to the term psychological resilience. In particular, the resilience behaviors seen in Puerto Rican community in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. This information will allow the development of a better understanding of resilience and how therapist can promote resilience in people after a natural disaster. 

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Define psychological resilience.
  2. Describe signs of resilience across different population after a disaster.
  3. Identify approaches to support resilience in the aftermath of a natural disaster.

Learn More and Register

Choose a version of this course for more information and to register online:

CEU Course for Psychologists CME/CEU Credit Course

Spanish in Psychiatry: Spanish Is Coming to a Child Psychiatrist Near You

Course Details 

  • The target audience for this course is psychologists, physicians, social workers and other interested health care professionals.
  • The instructional level of this course is intermediate.
  • 1 CE hour/credit.
  • This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation criteria and policies of the Rhode Island Medical Society (RIMS) through the joint providership of Rhode Island Hospital and Bradley Hospital. Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • Rhode Island Hospital designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 
  • Rhode Island Hospital is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Rhode Island Hospital maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • CEUs for this event have been approved by the National Board for Social Work (NASW) in Rhode Island, designating this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 continuing education credits for certified counselors, marriage and family therapists. Approval #RI-6775.

hojmanPresented by

Horacio Hojman, MD, MBA
Outpatient Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, Child and Family Psychiatry, Rhode Island Hospital
Associate Professor (Clinical), Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Dr. Hojman has more than twenty years of experience in outpatient child psychiatry working with diverse populations in the practice of hospital, school and community psychiatry. He also works with the Latino population in different settings given that he comes from a Hispanic background and is from Buenos Aires, Argentina. Dr. Hojman also practices psychodynamic psychotherapy and his specialty area is the interface between psychotherapy and psychopharmacology.

He had his medical degree from the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina. After his initial residency in general psychiatry in Buenos Aires, he trained at the Tavistock Clinic in London, England in adolescent psychoanalysis and later came to the United States, were he completed his residency in general psychiatry at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago and at the Massachusetts/McLean combined program in Boston. He has been part of department of psychiatry and human behavior since 1997. He has taught general psychiatry residents, fellows and medical students. He also belongs to the Boston Psychoanalytic Institute.

About this Course

This course describes the importance of being able to speak the Spanish language among mental health professionals, which can significantly lower barriers to access to mental health services and improve quality of care among Hispanic children and their families. Being able to speak the Spanish language is more effective than interpreter services, as it increases cultural competence and leads to greater understanding of developing and growing up within two language cultures.

In recent years there has been a significant increase of the Latino/Hispanic population in the United States. It is a necessity for mental health professionals to learn the Spanish language as well as create Spanish language courses for young professionals in schools of medicine, psychology, nursing, and social work. A practitioner who speaks Spanish, even without full native fluency, can make children and immigrant parents feel welcome and also intensify the working alliance.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Recognize the importance for mental health professionals to be able to speak the Spanish language given the demographic growth of the Hispanic/Latino communities in recent years in the United States.
  2. Integrate the Spanish language into the mental health practitioner tool kit as a major instrument of clinical examination, as an English-speaking mental health provider cannot rely on it with the same assurance when he or she is working with patients who speak a different language.
  3. Disseminate knowledge about the importance of Spanish-speaking in mental health practitioners so it can be included within the curriculum of medical, nursing, psychological and social work schools. 

Learn More and Register

Choose a version of this course for more information and to register online:

CEU Course for Psychologists CME/CEU Credit Course

Supporting Optimal Sleep of Adolescents

Course Details

  • The target audience for this course is psychologists, physicians, social workers and other interested health care professionals.
  • The instructional level of this course is intermediate.
  • 1 CE hour/credit 
  • This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation criteria and policies of the Rhode Island Medical Society (RIMS) through the joint providership of Rhode Island Hospital and Bradley Hospital. Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • Rhode Island Hospital designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 
  • Rhode Island Hospital is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Rhode Island Hospital maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • CEUs for this event have been approved by the National Board for Social Work (NASW) in Rhode Island, designating this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 continuing education credit for certified counselors, marriage and family therapists. Approval #RI-6781.

Presented by

Mary A. Carskadon, PhD
Director, Chronobiology and Sleep Research, Bradley Hospital
Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Mary A. Carskadon, PhD, is director of chronobiology and sleep research at Bradley Hospital and a diplomat of the American Board of Sleep Medicine. She is an expert in sleep patterns, particularly in children and adolescents. Carskadon is a past president of the Sleep Research Society and organized the Women in Sleep Research interest group of the Sleep Research Society. She is a co-founder of the Northeastern Sleep Society and has served on the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research advisory board and as a member of the Development and Behavior Working Group of the National Children's Study. She is a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Space Biomedical Research Institute.

Dr. Carskadon is an associate editor of Behavioral Sleep Medicine. Carskadon received her bachelor's degree in psychology from Gettysburg College and her doctoral degree with distinction in neuro- and biobehavioral sciences from Stanford University, with a specialty in sleep research.

About this Course

This module provides an overview of issues regarding optimal sleep for adolescents, including how to determine whether sleep is adequate, and steps teens can take, with their parents’ help, to improve their sleep. Guidelines include advice for timing of light exposure, caffeine, and napping. At the end of the day, parents should have a better understanding of the ways they can help their children get more sleep.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Recognize some information about the challenges of determining how much sleep is enough.
  2. Illustrate an appreciation of some of the challenges faced by teens to get adequate sleep.
  3. Describe steps that can be taken to help teens sleep well, or at least better.

Learn More and Register

Choose a version of this course for more information and to register online:

CEU Course for Psychologists CME/CEU Credit Course

Tackling Tics: Advances in the Clinical Management of Tic Disorders

Course Details

  • The target audience for this course is psychologists, physicians, social workers and other interested health care professionals
  • The instructional level for this course is intermediate.
  • 1 CE hour/credit
  • This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation criteria and policies of the Rhode Island Medical Society (RIMS) through the joint providership of Rhode Island Hospital and Bradley Hospital. Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • Rhode Island Hospital designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 
  • Rhode Island Hospital is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Rhode Island Hospital maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • CEUs for this event have been approved by the National Board for Social Work (NASW) in Rhode Island, designating this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 continuing education credit for certified counselors, marriage and family therapists. Approval #RI-6774.

ConleaPresented by

Christine Conelea, PhD
Staff Psychologist, Bradley Hospital, Pediatric Anxiety Research Center (PARC)
Assistant Professor (Research), Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Christine Conelea, PhD, is an assistant professor (research) at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and a staff psychologist at the Bradley Hospital Pediatric Anxiety Research Center. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Nevada, Reno and doctorate from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Dr. Conelea completed her pre-doctoral internship and post-doctoral fellowship at Brown University. Dr. Conelea has published over forty peer-reviewed articles and book chapters on the topic of tic and obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders. She has been the recipient of research and training funding from the US National Institute of Mental Health. Dr. Conelea’s research and clinical interests are in the phenomenology, etiology, and treatment of tic and obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders.

About this Course

This module will provide an overview of the diagnosis and treatment of tic disorders in youth. The contemporary “neurobehavioral model” of tics will be covered, and current best-practice guidelines for tic management will be discussed, including recommended strategies for assessment, family education, and treatment. Evidence-based behavioral and medication interventions will be described and contrasted to alternative approaches that lack evidence for benefit.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify the characteristics and diagnostic criteria for tic disorders.
  2. Describe the current neurobehavioral model of tic disorders.
  3. Describe current best practice guidelines for tic management, including the roles of assessment, family education, and behavioral and medication interventions.
  4. Identify alternative treatments that do not benefit tics.

Learn More and Register

Choose a version of this course for more information and to register online:

CEU Course for Psychologists CME/CEU Credit Course

Talking with Children about Medication: From Ethics to Patient Education

Course Details

  • The target audience for thsi course is psychologists, physicians, social workers and other interested health care professionals.
  • The instructional level for this course is intermediate.
  • 1 CE hour/credit
  • This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation criteria and policies of the Rhode Island Medical Society (RIMS) through the joint providership of Rhode Island Hospital and Bradley Hospital. Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Rhode Island Hospital designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 
  • Rhode Island Hospital is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Rhode Island Hospital maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • CEUs for this event have been approved by the National Board for Social Work (NASW) in Rhode Island, designating this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 continuing education credit for certified counselors, marriage and family therapists. Approval #RI-6774.

Presented by

G. Oana Costea, MD
Director, Children’s Program, Bradley Hospital
Associate Professor (Clinical), Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Dr. Costea is a clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and human behavior at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University and has staff appointments at Bradley and Rhode Island Hospitals. Dr. Costea has been the director of the children’s inpatient program for nine years providing care to children with severe emotional and behavioral disturbances. As part of her work on an acute inpatient unit, Dr. Costea has provided pharmacological management for children with emotional and behavioral disorders that otherwise would not respond or would have limited response to therapeutic interventions. Additionally, working with families in a state of crisis and caregivers with their own emotional disorders with focus on stabilizing the entire family system has been a core component of Dr. Costea’s clinical work. 

Steven J. Barreto, PhD
Psychologist, Family Therapy Clinic, Adult Outpatient Psychiatry, Rhode Island Hospital
Associate Professor (Clinical), Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Steven J. Barreto, PhD, graduated from Stanford University and received a master’s in sociology and PhD in clinical psychology from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. His dissertation examined the utility and validity of the children’s depression inventory among urban African-American school-age children through the Detroit Core Cities Schools Intervention Project. He completed pre- and post-doctoral fellowships at the University of Michigan and a postdoctoral fellowship in the department of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown University, specializing in school-based intervention programs, ADHD assessment and family-centered residential treatment for children with serious emotional disturbance. 
 
Dr. Barreto has been the psychology coordinator of the children’s inpatient program at Bradley Hospital and the clinical director of Exeter House Residential Program as well as senior psychologist at the Bradley pediatric partial hospital program and child partial hospital program. Barreto lectures frequently on topics related to young children with serious emotional disturbance including, family treatment of aggression, bullying and digital aggression, and juvenile firesetting. In 2010 he was the recipient of Henrietta Leonard Award for Excellence in Teaching, in the division of child and adolescent psychiatry.

About this Course

The increasing use of psychotropic medications in children with emotional and behavioral problems has become a controversial topic over the last several years. Additionally, only a few psychotropic medications carry an FDA indication for use in pediatrics. Therefore, when conditions are resistant to other interventions, psychotropic medications are prescribed “off label” after careful consideration of the risks involved. The module discusses the ethical and developmental aspects involved in talking with children about medications, along with strategies that can improve effectiveness of medication education.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe ethical and developmental issues involved in discussing medication with children.
  2. Describe key elements of patient education regarding medication.

Learn More and Register

Choose a version of this course for more information and to register online:

CEU Course for Psychologists CME/CEU Credit Course

Understanding and Helping Adolescents with Non-Suicidal Self-Injurious Behavior

Course Details

  • The target audience for this course is psychologists, physicians, social workers and other interested health care professionals.
  • The instructional level for thsi course is intermediate.
  • 1 CE hour/credit (see below)
  • This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation criteria and policies of the Rhode Island Medical Society (RIMS) through the joint providership of Rhode Island Hospital and Bradley Hospital. Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • Rhode Island Hospital designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 
  • Rhode Island Hospital is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Rhode Island Hospital maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • CEUs for this event have been approved by the National Board for Social Work (NASW) in Rhode Island, designating this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 continuing education credit for certified counselors, marriage and family therapists. Approval #RI-6780. 

horowitzPresented by

Karyn Horowitz, MD
Director of Outpatient Child Psychiatry and Behavioral Health Services at Lifespan
Director, Outpatient Services at Emma Pendleton Bradley Hospital
Associate Professor (Clinical), Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Karyn Horowitz, MD, received her BA in honors psychology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI and her MD from Yale University School of Medicine where she graduated AOA. Following medical school she completed two years of internal medicine training at the University of Chicago Hospitals before entering her psychiatry training at Columbia University. She completed both her adult psychiatry residency and child and adolescent psychiatry fellowship at Columbia University. Currently she is the director of outpatient services and the access center at Bradley Hospital. She is also the director of psychotherapy training for the child psychiatry fellowship and triple board residency programs at the Warren Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University.

KittlerJennifer Kittler, PhD
Licensed Clinical Psychologist
Assistant Professor (Clinical), Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Jennifer Kittler, PhD, completed her doctoral training in clinical psychology at the University of Michigan, followed by an internship in clinical child psychology at Franciscan Children’s Hospital in Boston and a post-doctoral fellowship in child and adolescent psychopathology through Brown Medical School. She has provided evidenced-based individual, family, and group treatment to children and adolescents across a range of inpatient, partial, residential, acute outpatient and outpatient settings, and has participated in and published research focused on adolescent eating disorders, body image disturbance, and nonsuicidal self-injury. More recently, Dr. Kittler completed intensive training in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), receiving more than 100 hours of DBT training over the past three years. Dr. Kittler currently holds a faculty appointment of assistant professor (clinical) in the Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University. In addition, she has a private clinical psychology practice in Providence, RI, where she specializes in treating adolescents and young adults with acute and complex mental health issues, including mood and anxiety disorders, trauma, disordered eating, suicidality, and nonsuicidal self-injury.

About this Course

Nonsuicidal self-injurious behavior (NSSI) is increasingly prevalent among adolescents, yet many clinicians and other professionals who work with adolescents find this behavior challenging to understand, evaluate, and treat. This training module will provide a definition of NSSI, differentiate it from suicidal behavior, and provide an overview of common functions that this behavior serves among adolescents. We will further review psychiatric diagnoses and mental health issues that are common among adolescents who engage in NSSI, and provide an overview of effective strategies for intervening with, evaluating, and treating NSSI among adolescents.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Define non-suicidal self-injurious behavior (NSSI) and identify at least two functions it may serve for adolescents.
  2. Describe effective strategies for intervening with and evaluating adolescent NSSI.
  3. Describe an effective treatment intervention for adolescent NSSI.

Learn More and Register

Choose a version of this course for more information and to register online:

CEU Course for Psychologists CME/CEU Credit Course

Understanding Risk for Nonsuicidal Self-Injury

Course Details

  • The target audience for this course is psychologists, physicians, social workers and other interested health care professionals.
  • The instruction level for this course is intermediate.
  • 1 CE hour/credit
  • This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation criteria and policies of the Rhode Island Medical Society (RIMS) through the joint providership of Rhode Island Hospital and Bradley Hospital. Rhode Island Hospital is accredited by the Rhode Island Medical Society to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
  • Rhode Island Hospital designates this enduring activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 
  • Rhode Island Hospital is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Rhode Island Hospital maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
  • CEUs for this event have been approved by the National Board for Social Work (NASW) in Rhode Island, designating this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 continuing education credit for certified counselors, marriage and family therapists. 

Richard T. Liu, PhD, Staff Psychologist, Bradley HospitalPresented by

Richard T. Liu, PhD
Staff Psychologist, Bradley Hospital
Assistant Professor (Research) Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University 

Richard Liu, PhD, holds a doctoral degree in clinical psychology from Temple University and an undergraduate degree in psychology and anthropology from the Cornell University. As a licensed psychologist, Dr. Liu is currently an assistant professor (research) in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior of the Alpert Medical School of Brown University, and a staff psychologist at Bradley Hospital. Liu’s research focuses on identifying processes of risk underlying depression and self-injurious behaviors (suicide and non-suicidal self-injury), particularly in adolescents and young adults.

About this Course

This presentation will provide a broad overview of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in adolescents, including its prevalence in this age group, the reasons teens engage in this behavior, some of the most common risk factors for this behavior, and the current status of research on treatments for NSSI.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Describe reasons adolescents engage in NSSI.
  2. Describe risk factors for NSSI.
  3. Recognize research on treatments for NSSI.

Learn More and Register

Choose a version of this course for more information and to register online:

CEU Course for Psychologists CME/CEU Credit Course